Typhoon & Emperor

 

Typhoon & Emperor

 


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Kato. . . You’ve visited Japan at the wrong time, huh?


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You’re telling me, Diane. . . I arrived in Tokyo from Vancouver on October 8. . . Three days later, Typhoon Hagibis made landfaqll at Izu Peninsula.


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Typhoon Hagibis (台風19号)

 

Typhoon Hagibis was a large and powerful tropical cyclone that was considered to be the most devastating typhoon to hit the Kantō region of Japan since Ida in 1958.

Hagibis caused additional impacts to Japan, after Faxai struck the same region one month prior.

The nineteenth named storm and the ninth typhoon of the 2019 Pacific typhoon season, Hagibis developed from a tropical wave located a couple hundred miles north of the Marshall Islands on 2 October.

The system reached tropical storm status late on 5 October as it travelled westward.

Soon afterwards, Hagibis underwent a period of rapid intensification, which brought Hagibis to its peak intensity on 7 October.

After maintaining the peak intensity for about three days, Hagibis began to weaken due to less favorable environment.

On 12 October, Hagibis made landfall at Izu Peninsula as a Category 2–equivalent typhoon.

 


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Hagibis became extratropical on the following day.

Still recovering from the impacts of Faxai, Hagibis caused widespread damage across Japan, particularly in the Kantō region.

As of 20 October 2019, at least 83 people have been confirmed dead and 11 others went missing in Japan.

Early on 12 October, Hagibis triggered a tornado in Ichihara City.

About half an hour before Hagibis made landfall, a magnitude 5.7 earthquake occurred off the coast of Chiba Prefecture, worsening the dangerous condition even more.

 

Shelves in shops around Tokyo were quickly cleared, as people bought supplies ahead of Hagibis making landfall.

Forecasts across eastern, western, and northern Japan called for strong winds and torrential rain that would likely cause flooding and mudslides.

JR Group, Japan Airlines, and All Nippon Airways suspended services.

JMA weather forecaster, Yasushi Kajiwara, said, “It is a level 5 situation; some sort of disaster may have already taken place. People are strongly advised to act to protect their lives right away.”

Evacuation orders have been issued to more than 800,000 households across 11 prefectures.

Over 230,000 people took the advice to head to evacuation shelters.

The typhoon had effects on several major sporting events occurring in Japan.

Three matches of the 2019 Rugby World Cup were cancelled due to Hagibis, including the Pool B matches between New Zealand and Italy, and Canada and Namibia, and the Pool C match between England and France.

This marked the first time that matches have been cancelled in the history of the Rugby World Cup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All cancelled matches were counted as draws: the cancelled fixture effectively eliminated Italy from the tournament, as they had a chance to potentially qualify for the knockout stage with a sufficient margin of victory against New Zealand.

On 11 October, it was announced that the Saturday practice session for the 2019 Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka Circuit would be cancelled, and the Saturday qualifying session postponed to Sunday morning prior to the race.

The F4 Japanese Championship cancelled its round at the circuit as well.

Despite the games being played indoors in domed stadiums, Nippon Professional Baseball postponed both Game 4 Climax Series games in the 2019 Pacific League Climax Series and the 2019 Central League Climax Series.

Both games were planned to take place on Saturday, October 12, one in Tokorozawa, Saitama, the other in Bunkyō, Tokyo.

The games were instead played the next day on Sunday, October 13.


Source:“Typhoon Hagibis (2019)”
Free encyclopedia “Wikipedia”

I see. . . As of 20 October 2019, at least 83 people have been confirmed dead, huh?. . .

That’s right. . .

So obviously you’ve survived the disaster, haven’t you?

You’re telling me, Diane.

How about your family?

All of my hamily and relatives are safe and healthy. . . Thank you very much for asking. . .

I understand your folks are living in the flooding area, aren’t you?

No, not really. . .

 


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Gyoda, my hometown, is actually located in the path of the typhoon, but fortunetely the typhoon ignored my hometown; instead it hit Sano hard with a tornado.

 


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The tornado turned the car over, and the driver was killed.

Have you ever suffered from any typhoon?

Oh yes, I was a kid when the most devastating typhoon, Ida, hit the Kantō region of Japan in 1958 . . . Since I got sick and tired of natural disasters in Japan I decided to immigrate to Canada.

I see. . . So you’ve become a Canadian citizen, huh?

That’s right.

By the way, how come the emperor made a ceremony during the typhoon season?


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Emperor Naruhito completes enthronement

in ceremony rich with history and ritual

by Sakura Murakami

Oct 22, 2019

 

Emperor Naruhito cut a grand figure Tuesday as the deep purple curtains of his canopied, 6.5-meter-tall throne were pulled apart to reveal him enrobed in an orange-brown garment, a black crown atop his head, as he announced his enthronement to the world.

“Having previously succeeded to the imperial throne in accordance with the Constitution of Japan and the Special Measures Law on the Imperial House Law. I now … proclaim my enthronement to those at home and abroad,” he declared at the enthronement ceremony, called Sokui no Rei, which was attended by around 2,000 dignitaries from some 180 countries and regions.

Sokui no Rei is one of the major events in a series of ceremonies and rites scheduled throughout the year following Emperor Naruhito’s accession to the chrysanthemum throne in May.

Although he officially became emperor on May 1, after his father — now Emperor Emeritus Akihito — stepped down from the throne due to his advanced age, Tuesday’s ceremony marks the official declaration of Emperor Naruhito’s enthronement.

“I pledge hereby that I shall act according to the Constitution, and fulfill my responsibility as the symbol of the state and of the unity of the people of Japan, while always wishing for the happiness of the people and the peace of the world, turning my thoughts to the people and standing by them,” he said, underlining the emperor’s role within the country’s supreme law.

The ceremony saw the emperor and empress in regal attire entering the Pine Chamber of the Imperial Palace, as attending dignitaries watched by video link from within the Imperial Palace.

Big names such as Prince Charles from the United Kingdom, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao from the United States, Chinese Vice President Wang Qishan and South Korean Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon were there to congratulate the new emperor.

 


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Wearing imperial robes in a warm brown hue — a color reserved in times past especially for the emperor — Emperor Naruhito sat on the takamikura canopied throne, which is decorated with lacquer and gold phoenixes and sits atop a square dais.

His wife Empress Masako was in similarly regal attire, wearing a colorful and multilayered kimono, and sat on a smaller version of Emperor Naruhito’s throne.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe offered congratulations in response to the emperor’s speech, saying, “We, the people, look up to His Majesty the Emperor as the symbol of Japan and the unity of its people, and, with a renewed spirit, will put our best efforts into creating an era where new culture will flourish as a peaceful, hopeful and proud Japan realizes a bright future and the people come together in beautiful harmony.”

He then led the guests in a banzai salute before the emperor and empress exited the chamber.

 


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Initially, a parade had been planned for after the ceremony to allow the public to see the imperial couple drive by in a convertible sedan as they traveled back to their residence in the Akasaka district.

However, the government announced that they would reschedule the parade for Nov. 10 out of consideration for those affected by Typhoon Hagibis earlier in the month.

Celebrations were nevertheless set to continue for the guests in attendance, with the emperor and empress scheduled to host a total of four banquets, the first of which took place Tuesday evening.

Amid all the pomp and splendor, Tuesday’s ceremonies also highlighted the lack of male heirs to the throne.

As the current law stands, only male heirs of the male line of the family are permitted to succeed the throne.


Source:“Emperor Naruhito completes enthronement”
The Japan Times

The ceremony should’ve been held in the spring, during which no typhoons come, I suppose.

Actually, the first event for the enthronement was performed on April 30, when Emperor Akihito of Japan abdicated. This marked the end of the Heisei era and the inception of the Reiwa era, and saw numerous festivities leading up to the accession of his son and successor, Emperor Naruhito.

So the enthronement ceremony is one of traditional ceremonies for the new emperor, huh?

That’s right. . . As you know, the enthronement of the emperor of Japan is an ancient ceremony that marks the accession of a new monarch to the Chrysanthemum Throne, the world’s oldest continuous hereditary monarchy. . . Various ancient imperial regalia are given to the new sovereign during the course of the rite, which consists of several ceremonies. . . The last event will be held in December.

I see. . . So those traditional events have been held since April, and continue at times till December, huh?

Yes. . . You see, unfortunately some events have to be held during the typhoon season.

Well . . . I hope you’ll be able to come back to Vancouver without any accident nor typhoon.

Don’t worry about it since I’m a lucky man, and I’ll be able to see you the next month.


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【Himiko’s Monologue】


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Three matches of the 2019 Rugby World Cup were cancelled due to Hagibis, including the Pool B matches between New Zealand and Italy, and Canada and Namibia, and the Pool C match between England and France.

This marked the first time that matches have been cancelled in the history of the Rugby World Cup.

However, other matches were conducted.

You might want to see the highlight of the match between Japan and Ireland.

 


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How do you like the above game?

You don’t like rugby matches, do you?

Well… here’s a mood-changing clip just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


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  Mr. Mathane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


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If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


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“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


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Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


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Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


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Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery


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Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


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『Actual List』


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Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


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The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


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ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


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『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


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Call Girl Mystery

 

Call Girl Mystery

 


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Kato. . . Did you go to Paris recently and play with a high-priced call girl?


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Oh no, I am such a poor guy as, if I play with a high-priced call girl, I’ll go broke and become homeless.

Don’t be so pessimistic! Cheer up! . . . In any case, how come you’ve brought up a call girl?

Well . . . I recently borrowed a book from Vancouver Public Library and came across the following part. . .

 

The Dark Side of Paris

 


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Édouard Manet, sometimes referred to as the father of modern painting, is often spoken of as an impressionist, but he has never participated in an impressionist exhibition.
Rather, he was a painter who refused to exhibit at the Impressionist Exhibition.
At that time, the Impressionists were exposed to intense criticism because their novel painting methods were not recognized from the mainstream artists. . .

The theme chosen by Manet is a water-front leisure activity that was popular on the banks of the Seine at the outskirts of Paris, as the original title “Bathing” represents.
However, in the conservative audience at that time, the direct gaze toward the audience and the realistic nude body was too radical. . .

In this era, a plausible reason and/or excuse of “historical painting” was still necessary to draw the nude.
The above painting, however, appeared too shocking and too realistic as a real naked woman.
Critics and spectators condemned this work as “bad” and “immoral”. . .

They saw the dark side of the second imperial era in France, that is, the world of prostitution. . .

By the way, many high-priced courtesans worked in Paris during the 2nd Imperial period, but a strict moral view of social conducts prevailed.

 


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As a result of the invention of photos, some people imagined pornography on the market.
In times when paintings were supposed to be “noble”, Édouard Manet came to impose the reality on people.

The composition of the above painting is similar to the copperplate print “Judgement of Paris” produced by Marcantonio Raimondi (ca.1480 – ca.1534) based on Raphael’s drawing.
It seems obvious if you look at the three people in the lower right. . .

 


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The contrast between the male and female nudes is similar to that of “Concerto campestre” at the Louvre, which is now known as Titian’s work, but at that time people supposed that Giorgione (1476/78-1510) painted it. . .

 


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By the way, the current title “Lunch on Grass (Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe)” was renamed after Monet’s “Lunch on Grass” (1865-66) during the 1867 solo exhibition.

 


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(Pages 90-96)


Van Gogh’s Mental State

 

At the end of January 1890, a son was born to his brother Theo and Johanna.

Van Gogh, delighted with the birth of a nephew named the same Vincent Willem, began to work on a “Almond Blossom” as a gift. . .

 


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On July 6th, Van Gogh went to Paris on a day trip and learned about Theo’s economic hardship.
Theo, who had also sent money to his Dutch family after his father died, told Van Gogh that he could not expect a stable income like before because he was thinking about setting up his own business after leaving Goupil & Cie, where he was in charge of management.
Awkward and heavy air drifted through Theo’s family.

At that time, Theo, who was not born strong, was not in good health.
The couple was exhausted with care for the sick baby, and his wife Johanna was so tired that she fell sick.

The remittance to Van Gogh spurred the suffering and fatigue of Theo and cast a dark shadow on the marital relationship.
Faced with the plight of his brother and his wife, Van Gogh came to realize that he couldn’t rely on Theo any more.

Now van Gogh understood that Theo considered his family more important than van Gogh. . .

Aware of being too late to start a new life, van Gogh got troubled and began to get sick mentally. . .

Van Gogh devoted himself to the paintings as if to escape from loneliness and fear. His mental state clearly reflects on the “Wheatfield with Crows” drawn at this time.

 


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(Pages 119-121)

(Note:red characters are emphasized by Kato.
Photo from Denman Library
Translated by Kato)


SOURCE: 『人騒がせな名画たち』
著者: 木村泰司
2018年10月5日 第1刷発行
発行所: 株式会社 マガジンハウス

I see. . . There were many high-priced courtesans in Paris during the 2nd Empire period, huh?. . .

That’s right. . .

. . . So when was the second imperial era?

Please read the following a Wikipedia article about the second imperial era. . .

Second French Empire

 

The Second French Empire was the regime of Napoleon III from 1852 to 1870, between the Second Republic and the Third Republic, in France.

 


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Historians in the 1930s and 1940s often disparaged the Second Empire as a precursor of fascism.
That interpretation is no longer promulgated and by the late 20th century they were celebrating it as leading example of a modernizing regime.

Historians have generally given the Empire negative evaluations on its foreign-policy, and somewhat more positive evaluations of domestic policies, especially after Napoleon III liberalized his rule after 1858.

He promoted French business and exports.
The greatest achievements came in material improvements, in the form of a grand railway network that facilitated commerce and tied the nation together and centered it on Paris.

It had the effect of stimulating economic growth, and bringing prosperity to most regions of the country.
The Second Empire is given high credit for the rebuilding of Paris with broad boulevards, striking public buildings, and very attractive residential districts for upscale Parisians.

In international policy, Napoleon III tried to emulate his uncle, engaging in numerous imperial ventures around the world as well as several wars in Europe.

Using very harsh methods, he built up the French Empire in North Africa and in Southeast Asia.
Napoleon III also sought to modernize the Mexican economy and bring it into the French orbit, but this ended in a fiasco.
He badly mishandled the threat from Prussia, and by the end of his reign, Napoleon III found himself without allies in the face of overwhelming German force.


Source:“French Second Empire”
Free encyclopedia “Wikipedia”
 


Cafés and restaurants

Thanks to the growing number of wealthy Parisians and tourists coming to the city and the new network of railroads that delivered fresh seafood, meat, vegetables and fruit to Les Halles every morning, Paris during the Second Empire had some of the best restaurants in the world.
The greatest concentration of top-class restaurants was on the Boulevard des Italiens, near the theaters.
The most prominent of these at the beginning the Empire was the Café de Paris, opened in 1826, which was located on the ground floor of the Hôtel de Brancas.
It was decorated in the style of a grand apartment, with high ceilings, large mirrors and elegant furniture.
The director of the Paris Opéra had a table reserved for him there, and it was a frequent meeting place for characters in the novels of Balzac.
It was unable to adapt to the style of the Second Empire, however; it closed too early, at ten in the evening, the hour when the new wealthy class of Second Empire Parisians were just going out to dinner after the theatre or a ball.
As a result, it went out of business in 1856.

The most famous newer restaurants on the Boulevard des Italiens were the Maison Dorée, the Café Riche and the Café Anglais, the latter two of which faced each other across the boulevard.
They, and the other cafés modelled after them, had a similar arrangement.
Inside the door, the clients were welcomed by the dame de comptoir, always a beautiful woman who was very elegantly dressed.
Besides welcoming the clients, she was in charge of the distribution of pieces of sugar, two for each demitasse of coffee.
A demitasse of coffee cost between 35 and 40 centimes, to which clients usually added a tip of two sous, or ten centimes.
An extra piece of sugar cost ten centimes.
The floor of the café was lightly covered with sand, so the hurrying waiters would not slip.
The technology of the coffee service was greatly improved in 1855 with the invention of the hydrostatic coffee percolator, first presented at the Paris Universal Exposition of 1855, which allowed a café to produce 50,000 demitasses a day.

The Maison Dorée was decorated in an extravagant Moorish style, with white walls and gilded furnishings, balconies and statues.
It had six dining salons and 26 small private rooms.
The private dining rooms were elegantly furnished with large sofas as well as tables and were a popular place for clandestine romances.
They also featured large mirrors, where women had the tradition of scratching messages with their diamond rings.
It was a popular meeting place between high society and what was known as the demimonde of actresses and courtesans; it was a favorite dining place of Nana in the novel of that name by Émile Zola.

 


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Source:“Paris during the Second Empire”
Free encyclopedia “Wikipedia”

Tell me, Kato, in the Japanese history, what happened during that period.

It was around the end of the Edo period before the Meiji Restoration. . . Commodore Matthew Perry of the United States Navy came to Japan with a 4-ship fleet in 1853, and played a leading role in the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854, which in turn led Japan to the beginning of the Meiji Restoration. . .

I see, but how come you focus on Call Girl in Paris?

Well, in those days, even at the end of the Edo period in Japan and later during the Meiji Restoration, a great number of prostitutes entertained men in regulated brothels as well as private brothels. . . So did courtesans in Paris.

I wonder if van Gogh had something to do with a sex worker or a brothel.

Yes, he did. . . Van Gogh lived with an ex-prostitute during the Hague era.

The Hague (1882-183) era

 


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Mauve took Van Gogh on as a student and introduced him to watercolour, which he worked on for the next month before returning home for Christmas.
He quarrelled with his father, refusing to attend church, and left for The Hague.

In January 1882, Mauve introduced him to painting in oil and lent him money to set up a studio.
Within a month Van Gogh and Mauve fell out, possibly over the viability of drawing from plaster casts.

Van Gogh could afford to hire only people from the street as models, a practice of which Mauve seems to have disapproved.
In June Van Gogh suffered a bout of gonorrhoea and spent three weeks in hospital.

Soon after, he first painted in oils, bought with money borrowed from Theo.
He liked the medium, and spread the paint liberally, scraping from the canvas and working back with the brush.
He wrote that he was surprised at how good the results were.

By March 1882, Mauve appears to have gone cold towards Van Gogh, and stopped replying to his letters.
He had learned of Van Gogh’s new domestic arrangement with an alcoholic prostitute, Clasina Maria “Sien” Hoornik (1850–1904), and her young daughter.
Van Gogh had met Sien towards the end of January 1882, when she had a five-year-old daughter and was pregnant.

 


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“Sorrow” depicting Sien

April 1882 The Hague sketch (black chalk)

 

She had previously borne two children who died, but Van Gogh was unaware of this; on 2 July, she gave birth to a baby boy, Willem.
When Van Gogh’s father discovered the details of their relationship, he put pressure on his son to abandon Sien and her two children.

Vincent at first defied him, and considered moving the family out of the city, but in late 1883, he left Sien and the children.

Poverty may have pushed Sien back into prostitution; the home became less happy and Van Gogh may have felt family life was irreconcilable with his artistic development.
Sien gave her daughter to her mother, and baby Willem to her brother.
Willem remembered visiting Rotterdam when he was about 12, when an uncle tried to persuade Sien to marry to legitimise the child.
He believed Van Gogh was his father, but the timing of his birth makes this unlikely.
Sien drowned herself in the River Scheldt in 1904.


Source:“Vincent van Gogh”
Free encyclopedia “Wikipedia”

In late 1883, van Gogh left Sien and went to Paris, didn’t he?

That’s right. . . He stayed in Paris, but after all, Paris was a difficult place for van Gogh to live. So, he moved to Arles, southern France, and started living there. . .

So, in Arles, did Van Gogh get involved with a sex worker?

That’s the mystery I’m talking about. . .

What do you mean?

As the above book tells you, van Gogh became mentally sick. . .

Why is that?

Well. . . , van Gogh received a letter that informed him that his brother Theo was engaged with Johanna, and van Gogh understood that his financial assistance would be cut off. At the same time, Gauguin told him that he couldn’t live together and would leave. Van Gogh was so profoundly depressed with this double problems that he cut his left ear with his razor on the spur of the moment. . .

 


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It looks like van Gogh cut his right ear. . .

At first I thought so when I saw the above picture. . . But the Wikipedia article says he cut his left ear. . . You know what? Van Gogh painted it while looking at him in the mirror. . . In other words, he simplay painted what he saw in the mirror, that is, the opposite image of the real thing.

I see. . . So what happened to the cut ear?

Out of all things and choices, Van Gogh wrapped the ear in paper and handed it over to a girl in a brothel he had visited several times. . .

So van Gogh gave it to his favorite sex worker, didn’t he?

That is the mystery. . . Actually, there is a documentary that delves into this mystery. . .

Kato, did you see this documentary?

Yes, I did. . .

 


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“Zoom in”

“Actual page”


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Kato’s Comment

Produced and directed by Jack MacInnes in 2016, this 56-minute documentary delves into the mystery of what really happened on the night of Dcember 23, 1888, in the French town of Arles.

Vincent van Gogh cut his ear and delivered it in person to a girl called “Rachel” in the nearby brothel.

Why did he do it?

Amazing and intriguing!

 

I see. . . So van Gogh gave the ear to a girl called “Rachel”, huh? But you seem to intentionally write a girl, instead of prostitute or hooker. . . Why is that?

So this is Call Girl Mystery.

Kato, are you kidding? Is this a pun or something?

Actually, this girl’s real name was Gabrielle and she was nicknamed “Gabi”.

Was “Rachel” the name used at the brothel?

Yes, it was, but she wasn’t working as a sex worker.

Why not?

This girl was 19 at the time and died in 1952 at the age of 80. . . Bernadetta Murphy in the above documentary actually visited her grandson and learned that the girl called “Rachel” at the brothel worked as a cleaning girl. . .

In other words, instead of sleeping with her, van Gogh was rather in a friendly relationship with this girl, huh?. . .

I guess so. . . Obviously, van Gogh liked this girl and might have had a pleasant chat with her at times. . . Van Gogh cut his ear and then walked to this brothel nearby, and handed it to this girl and said, “I want you to cherish it.” . . .

 


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Amazing! . . . She might’ve been shocked to death when she found a bloody ear wrapped in a piece of paper. . . Couldn’t van Gogh think of her feelings when she would find his bloody ear wrapped in a paper?

He did it because he was mentally sick. . . If van Gogh had been in a normal mental state, he wouldn’t have done it!

Why did van Gogh cut his ear in the first place?

Good question! . . . Whenever somebody hears this story, he or she will have the same question! . . . Actually I had the same question when I heard this story for the first time.

Don’t waste my time. . . Please tell me why. . .

Well . . . , Diane, probabaly you know that van Gogh had once thought of becoming a pastor. . . Whenever he found his spare time, van Gogh translated Bible chapters into English, French, and German. Van Gogh also prayed for a long time at the table, did not eat meat, and went to the Jansen Church, Catholic Church, Lutheran Church on Sundays as well as the Dutch Reformed Church. . .

In other words, van Gogh was a devout Christian, huh?

You’re telling me, Diane. . . In the Bible, there is a story about cutting a ear. . .

Oh yeah?. . . Tell me about it. . .

The above documentary explains that Van Gogh naturally knew the Biblical story, in which the apostle Peter had resisted the centurion who tried to arrest Jesus and cut his ear. . .

 


(vangoh20.jpg)

 

Kato, are you saying that, recalling the above story, van Gogh cut his own ear on the spur of the moment?

The above documentary seems to interpret the incident that way. . .

Kato, what do you think about it?

Well . . . , Van Gogh seemed in a big trouble because he would have no or little economic assistance from Theo in the near future. . . At that time, because of the difference in opinions, Gauguin told van Gogh that he would leave Arles. Thus, van Gogh plunged into a fathomless depress.

In other words, van Gogh mentally went beyond the limit, huh?

I think so. . . Van Gogh can’t hate Theo. . . He had no courage to cut Gauguin’s ear with a razor. . . At this point in time, he might have come up with the Biblical tale of ear-cutting and came to realize that he himself was to blame, and he cut off his ear on the spur of the moment!

So, eventually he blamed himself and cut off his ear as the spostle Peter did to the centurion, huh?

I can’t think of anything else!


(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

Are you interested in the life of Vincent van Gogh?

There is a famous movie titled “Lust for Life”.

Kirk Douglas plays brilliantly as Van Gogh in an unforgettable performance.

 


(vangoh24.jpg)

 

How do you like the above trailer?

Are you tired of reading and viewing the crazy artist?

Well… here’s a mood-changing tune just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)


(1001nite10.jpg)

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Mystery of Dimension

 

Mystery of Dimension

 

(god031.jpg)

(dimanim3.gif)


(dimanim6.gif)


(dimanim.gif)


(dimanim4.gif)


(dimanim5.gif)


(diane02.gif)

Kato. . . , what kind of mystery is that?


(kato3.gif)

Diane, have you ever heard of a four-dimensional world?

Of course, I have. . . We’re living in the four-dimensional world or spacetime world, aren’t we?

Yes, most of us believe we are, but actually we’re living in a 10-dimensional world.

You gotta be kidding!

I’m dead serious!

But what about other six dimensions? What the heck are they? . . . And where in the world do we find those six dimensions?

Good question! . . . Tell me, Diane, what the dimension is.

Well. . . the dimension is a measurable extent of some kind, such as length, breadth, depth, or height. . . So usually we can move along the vertical, horizontal, height and time axis. . . Therefore, it is said that we’re living in a four-dimensional world.

 


(dimanim6.gif)

 

You’re darn right on that. . . But according to some mathematicians, our world has ten dimensions, which is mathematically proven.

Are you pulling my leg?

Oh no. . . I’m profoundly dead serious. . . If you’re in doubt, you should view the following clip.

 


(dim04.jpg)

 

In other words, the 10-dimensional world has something to do with the birth of the universe, huh?

That’s right. . . If you look carefully at the clip above, you can understand it. . .

Kato, can you understand it by only watching the above clip?

I think I can. . .

You can understand because you’ve got an engineering background, but I’m a student of liberal arts. . . Please explain it easily so that I can understand. . .

Well, first of all, I’ll talk about two theoritical physicists. . .

 


(god014.jpg)

 

The above two men are said to be the creators of the so-called superstring theory, but Joël Scherk, French physicist, died at the age of 34. . .

Was he killed by a traffic accident?

Oh no. . . He is said to have died because he suffered from severe diabetes. They say, he died of overdose. . .

So, that superstring theory is related to the 10-dimensional world, isn’t it?

That’s right. . . Currently, in his 70s John Schwarz teaches theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology. . .

 


(god001.jpg)


(god002.jpg)

 

This photo shows that Professor Schwarz teaches students in the lecture room, huh?

Oh no, he doesn’t. . . He’s writing mathematical formulas on the blackboard in his own office. . .

Is he doing research on a blackboard without using a computer? It’s much faster to do research using a personal computer. . . He could get better research, I suppose.

No, not really because no matter how great software he uses on his personal computer, he cannot get an original idea.

Why is that?

It is because every software and programs were originally created by humans. . . As long as you use such software, you will not come up with original ideas. . . So, in order to derive original formulas, it is best to do research while writing formulas by hand using a blackboard or whiteboard. . .

I see. . .

By the way, the big bang that occurred 13.8 billion years ago was predicted by a mathematical formula. . .

What is that formula?

That is Einstein’s general theory of relativity. . .

 


(dim05.jpg)

 

Is Einstein’s general theory of relativity flawed compared to the superstring theory?

Yes, it is. . . The general relativity cannot unravel the bottom of the black hole, that is, the profoundly microscopic world. . .

why. . . ?

It turns out that the birth of the universe has a deep connection with black holes. . .

 


(god009.jpg)

 

The big bang and the black hole are very similar in structure. . . The big bang and the bottom of the black hole are mathematically the only keys to the birth of the universe. . . In other words, in order to explore the birth of the universe, it is necessary to elucidate the black holes mathematically. . . However, the general theory of relativity cannot unravel the bottom of the black hole. . .

Why can the general relativity not unravel it?

If the depth of the black hole is squeezed by general relativity, the denominator will be zero at the depth of the black hole. . . This means infinity!

 


(god006.jpg)


(god007.jpg)

 

What’s wrong when the denominator becomes zero and becomes infinite?

When the denominator beconmes zero, it cannot be calculated in the mathematical formula. . . So, if you try to unravel the depth of a black hole with a mathematical formula, you cannot apply the general relativity, which is not valid. . .

In short, in order to unravel the depth of a black hole with a mathematical formula, you must understand the birth of the universe, huh?

That’s right. . .

 


(dim06.jpg)

“Zoom In”

 

In other words, unless the infinite problem is solved, the birth of the universe cannot be solved, huh?

You’re telling me. . .

So what happened?

Somebody came up with an idea. . . How about combining quantum mechanics with general relativity? . . .

 


(god010.jpg)


(god011.jpg)

 

This idea came to the mind of Matvei Bronstein (1906-1938) in the Soviet era. . .

 


(blonstein2.jpg)

 

He was a genius of theoretical physics. . . It is said that at the age of 19 he had understood the mathematical formulas of quantum mechanics and general relativity completely.

Wow! . . . So why did he die so young?

Just when he was immersed in his research, that is, in 1937, he was arrested and killed by Stalin. . . The intellectuals who were doing suspicious research seemed to Stalin an enemy who must be purged. . .

 


(stalin02.jpg)

 

Stalin did a terrible thing, didn’t he? . . . So what happened to the study of Matvei Bronstein?

Unfortunately, combining the two mathematical formulas did not provide an infinite solution. . . As the research progressed, the theoretical physicists found a great deal of infinity in the profoundly microscopic world. . .

 


(god012.jpg)

 

So the problem of infinity had deepened, huh?

That’s right. . . So, most researchers gave up and threw away the infinite mystery.

What happened then?

About 40 years later, precisely in 1974, two unknown theoretical physicists published a paper that solved the mystery. . . They are Joël Scherk and John Schwarz introduced above. . .

 


(god013.jpg)


(god014.jpg)

 

They were studying string theory that no one looked at. . . In this string theory, elementary particles are not dots but strings like threads.

 


(god015.jpg)

 

John Schwarz went further and discovered the superstring theory that solves an infinite problem. . . If an elementary particle is a point, it becomes infinite when two elementary particles collide.

So . . . ?

In the superstring theory, the distance does not become zero even if it collides because elementary particles are strings—not points, so there is no infinity. . .

 


(dim07.jpg)

 

However, there was a problem here. . . The condition that supports the superstring theory seems impossible in reality!

What is that condition?

The superstring theory is valid only in a 10-dimensionnal world.

 


(dim08.jpg)

 

That means that the universe was born as a 10-dimensional universe, huh?

That’s right. . . However, from a common-sense point of view, our world is not a 10-dimensional world. . .

According to Einstein, we’re living in a four-dimensional world or spacetime world. . . What are the other six dimensions?

So, many researchers came to conclusion that this theory was absurd and they gave up.

How about the followers of the superstring theory?

They combined two formulas, namely those of general relativity and quantum mechanics.

 


(god016.jpg)


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(god022.jpg)

 

When they verified whether the two formulas were included in the superstring theory formula, they were surprised to see the superstring formula include two formulas that seem to be completely unrelated. . . And they found the perfect number (496) appearing one after another.

 


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Perfect number

 

In number theory, a perfect number is a positive integer that is equal to the sum of its positive divisors, excluding the number itself.
For instance, 6 has divisors 1, 2 and 3 (excluding itself), and 1 + 2 + 3 = 6, so 6 is a perfect number.

The sum of divisors of a number, excluding the number itself, is called its aliquot sum, so a perfect number is one that is equal to its aliquot sum.
Equivalently, a perfect number is a number that is half the sum of all of its positive divisors including itself i.e. σ1(n) = 2n.
For instance, 28 is perfect as 1 + 2 + 4 + 7 + 14 + 28 = 56 = 2 × 28.

This definition is ancient, appearing as early as Euclid’s Elements (VII.22) where it is called τέλειος ἀριθμός (perfect, ideal, or complete number).
Euclid also proved a formation rule (IX.36) whereby q ( q + 1 ) / 2 {\displaystyle q(q+1)/2} {\displaystyle q(q+1)/2} is an even perfect number whenever q {\displaystyle q} q is a prime of the form 2 p − 1 {\displaystyle 2^{p}-1} 2^{p}-1 for prime p {\displaystyle p} p—what is now called a Mersenne prime.

Two millennia later, Euler proved that all even perfect numbers are of this form.
This is known as the Euclid–Euler theorem.

It is not known whether there are any odd perfect numbers, nor whether infinitely many perfect numbers exist.
The first few perfect numbers are 6, 28, 496 and 8128 (sequence A000396 in the OEIS).


Source: “Perfect number”
Free encyclopedia “Wikipedia”

In other words, it was thought for ages that perfect numbers symbolize completeness. . .

That’s right. . . Anyway, the news that the two formulas are included in the formula of the superstring theory became known to researchers all over the world. . . It was a sensation!

That’s how the superstring theory attracted attention, huh?

You’re telling me, Diane.

But what are the other six dimensions?

Well, for example, the one-dimensional world for humans are actually two-dimensional or three-dimensional world for ladybugs. . .

 


(god024.jpg)


(god025.jpg)


(god026.jpg)

 

In other words, as shown above, the person on a tightrope is one-dimensional on the cable. . . The person can only move forward and backward. . . However, there are dimensions invisible to the human eye because, for the ladybug, it is two-dimensional or three-dimensional world. . .

I see. . . But what exactly do you mean by a 10-dimensional world?

The remaining 6 dimensions are hidden in one ultra-micro world of one trillionth of a trillion of an atom!

 


(god027b.jpg)


(god027.jpg)


(dimanim.gif)

 

This solved the 10-dimensional problem, but there were more problems. . . The genius of that wheelchair proposed the “Hawking Paradox”.

 


(hawking.jpg)

“Why is heat generated at the bottom

of a black hole where even elementary particles

cannot move?”

 

So who solved it?

Joseph Polchinski, who appeared in the photo above, succeeded in calculating the heat of the black hole by adding a group of strings called “D-brane”.

 


(god028.jpg)

 

The film-like elementary particles move around in six dimensions, generating heat. . .

 


(god029.jpg)

 

In other words, Joseph Polchinski solved all the problems?

No, not really. . . In the latest research, some scientists insist that this universe is not 10-dimensional but 11-dimentional, and there is a hypothesis that there are a great number of universes—10 to the 500th power. . . The problem is deepening. . .

I wonder if scientists try to experimentally confirme that there are actually the remaining 6 dimensions.

Yes, they do. . . At the famous European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in France, scientists are experimenting to actually verify the remaining six dimensions using a giant accelerator. . .

 


(cern02.jpg)


(cern03.jpg)

 

Talking about the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the World Wide Web (WWW) was born here, huh?

That’s right. . . You’re telling me. . .

 


(cern01.jpg)



(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

Do you think that theoritical physicists improve our way of life?

You might think they are simply thinking at their desks—nothing more, nothing less.

Well, Dr. Michio Kaku will answer your question.

 


(kaku02.jpg)

 

How do you like his presentation?

Are you tired of listening to his talk?

Well… here’s a mood-changing tune just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)


(1001nite10.jpg)

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

World War B.C.

 

World War B.C.

 


(atombomb.jpg)


(lifeafter05.jpg)


(lifeafter07.jpg)


(diane02.gif)

Kato. . . , what do you mean by World War B.C.?


(kato3.gif)

World War before Christ.

Are you talking about the Peloponnesian War or something?

 


(pelopo2.jpg)

 

Oh no… I’m talking about a world war 20,000 years before Christ.

No kidding! . . . Do you really believe, Kato, there was a world war 20,000 years before Christ?

Yes, I do.

But …, but …, I’ve never learned at school that there was such a world war.

I bet you haven’t.

Kato, are you out of your mind? Or you must’ve had a nightmare last night, huh?

Oh no. . . I’m dead serious.

What makes you think so?

Actually, I’ve recently viewed the following documentary at Vancouver Public Library.

 


(lib90724a.png)


“Zoom In”

“Actual Page”


(lifeafter02.jpg)

 


(lifeafter00.jpg)

 

 


(lifeafter02c.jpg)

 

 


(lifeafter02d.jpg)

 

My Comment

July 02, 2019

Originally produced for a “History Channel” TV program in 2008, this 94-minute documentary takes you on an amazing, shocking and fascianting visial journey in the world without humans.

The film presents a thought-provoking and inspiring adventure that combines superb visual effects with insights from experts in the fields of engineering, botany, ecology, geology, climatology, archaeology and astrophysics to demonstrate how the landscape of our planet will change in our absence.

If you’re interested in the World War III and climate change, this is a must-see.

 

Well . . . It’s quite interesting and shocking, but it has something to do with a future nuclear war and its aftermath, doesn’t it?

Yes, it does. . . After I viewed the above documentary, however, I recalled the following passage:


(bermuda01.jpg)

 

Certain Asians, and Westerners as well, who subscribe to the theory that civilized man has existed for a much longer time than previously suspected do not find unbelievable the possibility of cresting and vanishing waves of civilization throughout the world, some of which have left no trace except in legend.

They therefore are prepared to believe that the unexpectedly detailed Indian references (such as the Mahabharata) to atoms, atomic structure, atomic weapons, and advanced technology may be simply a preserved memory of prehistoric and scientisticlly advanced civilizations.

In the legends of India, we should also consider the fact that certain sections of the earth’s surface seem to show atomic scars acquired millennia previous to present atomic activities.

These locations exist in Siberia, Iraq, Colorado, and Mongolia.

In the course of an exploratory digging in southern Iraq in 1947, layers of culture were successively cored into by what one might call an archaeological mine shaft.

Starting from the present ground level, the excavation passed the ancient city culture levels of Babylonia, and Sumeria, with flood levels between different sages of city culture, then the first village levels, then a level corresponding to that of primitive farmers at a time era of 6000 to 7000 B.C., and beloe that, indications of a herdsman culture, and finally a time era was reached corresponding to the Magdalenian or cave culture of about 16,000 years ago.

Still farther down, at the botom of all levels, a floor of fused glass was revealed, similar to nothing else except the desert floow in New Mexico after the blasts which inaugurated our present atomic era.

 


(atombomb.jpg)


SOURCE: pp. 229-230
“The Bermuda Triangle” by Charles Berlitz
First Avon Printing, September 1975

Let’s suppose that there was an advanced civilization like ours 20,000 years ago and that a nuclear war took place at that time.

But if what you say is true, then we can see some evidences.

That’s the very reason I showed the above movie. . . Once you view the above documentary, you should be able to understand that even an advanced civilization will leave no trace except in legend 10,000 years after such a world war.

 


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(lifeafter02c.jpg)

 

 


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Now I see your point, but I still think that there must be some indication of a lost civilization that existed 20,000 years ago.

Oh yes, there are some indications of lost civilization. . . For example, a 500-year-old map called “the Piri Reis Map” has been discovered and it could rewrite our human history.

 


(pirimap2.jpg)

 

This map was found in 1929 amid the clutter of the former harem of the ousted Sultan of Turkey, clearly shows the true coast of Antarctica as it would be without the covering ice, as well as the topography of the interior, also without the covering ice.

I see. . . Antarctica has been covered by ice for 6000 years as a minimum. . . So, this would mean that the original map was made considerably before recorded history, huh?

Yes, Diane, you’re telling me. . . There is another map called “the Buache Map”.

 


(buache01.jpg)

“Zoom In”

 

The above map shows Antarctica without ice

I see. . . So you think the above map was created in the advanced civilization 20,000 years ago, huh?

Yes, that’s right.

Is there any other indication?

Oh yes, from 1968 to the present time, underwater discoveries have been made, especially near Bimini, of what seems to have been massive stonework on the present sea bottom, huge blocks of stone placed together in what may be roads, platforms, harbor works, or fallen walls.

What are those stone works?

They strangely resemble the pre-Inca stonework of Peru, the pillars of Stonehenge, or the Cyclopean walls of Minoan Greece. . . The age of the stones is uncertain, although fossilized mangrove roots which had grown over the stones have given carbon 14 datings of about 12,000 years.

 


(bimini02.jpg)

 

I see. . . So, around the present Bahama islands, there might have been an advanced civilization some ten thousands years ago, huh?

Yes, there might. . . Besides, there is an interesting story about the Great Pyramid and the Sphinx.

Tell me about it.

Well. . . In 1994, a book called “The Orion Mystery” was published and bacame a best seller.

What makes it so outstanding?

The author said, the Great Sphinx was constructed around 10,500 BC (Upper Paleolithic) unlike the history-textbook date of 2,500 BC.


(orion3.jpg)

 

Bauval is specifically known for the Orion Correlation Theory (OCT), which proposes a relationship between the fourth dynasty Egyptian pyramids of the Giza Plateau and the alignment of certain stars in the constellation of Orion.

However, 20 years before Bauval’s book “The Orion Mystery” suggested that the Giza Pyramids were aligned to Orion’s belt, Dr. James J. Hurtak pointed out such a correlation in 1973.

One night in 1983, while working in Saudi Arabia, he took his family and a friend’s family up into the sand dunes of the Arabian desert for a camping expedition.
His friend pointed out the constellation of Orion, and mentioned that Alnitak, the most easterly of the stars making up Orion’s belt, was offset slightly from the others.
Bauval then made a connection between the layout of the three main stars in Orion’s belt and the layout of the three main pyramids in the Giza necropolis.

The Orion Correlation Theory has been described as a form of pseudoscience.
Among the idea’s critics have been two astronomers: Ed Krupp of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, and Anthony Fairall, astronomy professor at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.
Krupp and Fairall independently investigated the angle between the alignment of Orion’s Belt to North during the era cited by Bauval (which differs from the angle in the 3rd millennium BCE, because of the precession of the equinoxes), and found that the angle was somewhat different from the ‘perfect match’ claimed by Bauval and Hancock: 47 to 50 degrees, compared to the 38-degree angle formed by the pyramids.

Krupp also pointed out that the slightly-bent line formed by the three pyramids was deviated towards the North, whereas the slight “kink” in the line of Orion’s Belt was deformed to the South, meaning that a direct correlation would require one or the other to be inverted.

Indeed, this is what was done in the original book by Bauval and Gilbert (The Orion Mystery), which compared images of the pyramids and Orion without revealing that the pyramids’ map had been inverted.
Krupp and Fairall find other problems with the claims, including the point that if the Sphinx is meant to represent the constellation of Leo, then it should be on the opposite side of the Nile (the ‘Milky Way’) from the pyramids (‘Orion’), that the vernal equinox around 10,500 BCE was in Virgo and not Leo, and that the constellations of the Zodiac originate from Mesopotamia and were unknown in Egypt at the time.


SOURCE: “Robert Bauval”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

Quite interesting! . . . So, there might have been an advanced civilization before the Egyptian Dynasty, huh?

Yes, there might. . . I’m pretty sure, some day somebody will discover an undeniable evidence of an advanced civilization that existed more than 20,000 years ago.


(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

Do you think that an advanced civilization existed more than 20,000 years ago?

What? . . . You don’t like to talk about pseudoscience, do you?

“Tell me another interesting story!”

If you say so, I’ll show you the following clip:

Here’s a clip for a certain woman to use for making love.

 


(sexygal2.jpg)

 

How do you like the above music?

Are you tired of sexy music?

Well… here’s a mood-changing tune just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)


(1001nite10.jpg)

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Unknown Tragedy

 

Unknown Tragedy

 


(inno01.jpg)


(soren01.jpg)


(inno02.jpg)


(diane02.gif)

Kato. . . , are you talking about an unknown tragedy?


(kato3.gif)

Yes, that’s right. . . Diane, you don’t like it, do you?

Well . . . honestly, I prefer comedy to tragedy.

Yes, yes, yes,… of course, it’s understandable.

But, Kato, how come you pick up an unknown tragedy among all other things.

Good question! . . . Actually, a couple of days ago, I read the following passage from the book borrowed at Vancouver Public Library. . .


(soren01.jpg)

 

What is not well known in Japan is the rape done by the Soviet Union soldiers in the occupied area before arriving in Berlin.
This happened not only in Germany, but also in the countries of Eastern Europe, which lie between the Soviet Union border and Germany.
Thus, the total number of Soviet army rapes rose to a tremendous number.

Naturally, rape didn’t stop there because the women resisted, and the soldiers committed war crimes such as assault, injury and murder.

According to one theory, Soviet soldiers killed about 10% of raped women.
Besides, there were other women who committed suicide.
Naturally, sexually transmitted diseases spread among victims, and then transmitted to families as well.

It was even more miserable if the women got pregnant. . . .

The rate of pregnancy by rape done by the Soviet Union soldiers became as high as 20 percent. . . .

It is reported that 11,000 German women became pregnant by the Soviet army’s rape after the fall of Berlin, and 1,100 “Russian” children were born because they were not abandoned due to religious or other reasons. . . .

After all, although rape is a war crime that is unforgivable for women, it must be said that it is strange that only Japanese army is criticized in terms of “comfort woman” issue.

 


(arima01.jpg)

 


(translated by Kato)

237-238ページ 『こうして歴史問題は捏造される』
著者: 有馬哲夫
2017(平成29)年9月20日 初版発行
発行所: 株式会社 新潮社

I see. . . As a matter of fact, I once read a story about the Soviet Union army who raped the Japanese women when the Soviet Union army invaded Manchuria.

Oh, did you?

So, the Soviet Union army also raped the women while they advanced along the way to reach Berlin, didn’t they?

Yes, you’re telling me, Diane. . . In fact, I viewed a movie made based on those historical facts. . .

Did you?

Yes, I borrowed a DVD at Vancouver Public Library last November and watched the following movie. . .

 


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“Zoom in”

“The actual page”


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My Comment

November 28, 2018

Directed by Anne Fontaine in 2016 based on the real events, this French drama delves into the aftermath of mass rapes by Soviet soldiers at the convent in Poland.

The pregnant nuns go through an unprecedented crisis of faith.

Though it does not seem easy to watch, its nuanced exploration of the minds of the strict Mother Superior as well as the victimized nuns appears well worth watching.

 

The Innocents

 


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The Innocents, also known as Agnus Dei, is a 2016 French film directed by Anne Fontaine, which features Lou de Laâge, Agata Kulesza, Agata Buzek and Vincent Macaigne in its cast.
The script is by Sabrina B. Karine, Pascal Bonitzer, Anne Fontaine and Alice Vial, after an original idea by Philippe Maynial.
Maynial took inspiration from the experiences of his aunt, Madeleine Pauliac, a French Red Cross doctor who worked in Poland after World War II, dealing with the aftermath of mass rapes by Soviet soldiers.

 


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Producer Eric and Nicola Altmeyer (French version) who knew about the tragic incident that happened in the Polish monastery immediately after World War II from Dr. Pauliac’s diary, and the French director Anne Fontine I asked for a production.

Director Fontaine goes to the field with Polish historians to investigate.
And you get confirmation that the incident actually happened in the three abbeys.
Born in a Catholic family, Director Fontine has two nuns aunts.

In order to understand the movements of the nuns, I experienced life as a “practitioner” in a Benedictine abbey similar to a movie.
“Today the war and terrorism have killed the general public all over the world. The most important thing is strong solidarity. It is important to find hope even in a desperate situation,” said Fontaine.

 

Summary

In Warsaw, December 1945, a nun known as Sister Maria approaches a young French female student doctor, Mathilde Beaulieu, serving with an army unit. She says there are sick women in need and is not satisfied with a referral to the Polish Red Cross.

Beaulieu decides to go at night to the nun’s convent, where one woman has given birth.
The Mother Superior tells her that the nun was thrown out by her family and was taken in out of charity.
Beaulieu tells the Mother Superior (Abbess) that she works for the French Red Cross.

A novice nun at the convent is grieving the death of another nun.
Confined to her cell, she engages in morning prayer.

Later the Abbess discloses to Beaulieu that several nuns at the convent were raped by Russian soldiers, relating that the experience was nightmarish, and they wish to keep this a secret.
Seven of the nuns are pregnant.

Some of the pregnant nuns are reluctant to be examined intimately by the doctor, believing this will violate their vow of chastity.
One of the nuns confesses to Mother Superior that her faith has been deeply shaken by these events.

Soldiers come to the convent believing the nuns are harboring an enemy soldier.
However, Beaulieu convinces them she is there to deal with an emergency outbreak of typhus.

The Mother Superior is badly shaken by the threat of the soldiers, and thanks the doctor for her presence of mind.
Beaulieu realizes that she too was raped.

The Master of Novices tells the doctor that every day she is reminded of these harsh events.
She relates how faith has become more difficult for her but it is the cross she bears.

When Beaulieu returns to headquarters, her boss chastises her for having been away without leave.
He says that the military is a place of order and discipline.

At a later visit at the convent, Beaulieu is present when another novice nun gives birth unexpectedly.
This nun had not realized she was pregnant, and does not seem to know she has given birth.

The Abbess had given orders that she be notified of all births, but Beaulieu requests that she not be notified immediately.
The doctor needs to focus on care for the newborn.
A different nun, Sister Zofia, takes responsibility for the child.

Beaulieu asks the Master of Novices if she ever regrets her life as a nun.
The novice replies, “Faith is 24 hours of doubt with one minute of hope”, going on to describe her difficulties with the practice.

Beaulieu returns to the army medical unit, and discovers the unit is going to be transferred out of the area.

Several nuns are about to give birth at once.

 


(inno02.jpg)

 

Beaulieu returns to the convent with a male Jewish colleague.
She assures the nuns that he will keep their secret.
The doctor visits the baby whose existence has been kept secret from the Abbess.

The Master of Novices plans to take the baby to the Zofia’s family, but the baby is discovered by the abbess.
The Abbess is upset that she was lied to and tells the Master of Novices that she has been corrupted by “that French woman”, who has brought scandal and disorder to the convent.
The Master of Novices replies, “Forgive me, but scandal and disorder were already here”.

The Mother Superior has been telling everyone that she takes the babies to families who have agreed to adopt, but she abandons this baby in front of a crucifix on a country walking path, after baptising it.
Zofia is distraught, knowing the child is missing.
The Mother Superior privately prays that she have the courage to continue on the path she has chosen.

Meanwhile, Sister Zofia commits suicide by jumping from an upper ledge, dying shortly after her wounded body is discovered.

When the Master of Novices goes to Zofia’s family to report her death, she discovers that Zofia’s mother never knew Zofia had a child, nor that she has been caring for the baby.
The Master of Novices decides to not tell the mother the truth.
This is the Master of Novices’ first realization that the Abbess has been dishonest about the fate of the babies.

She confronts the Abbess demanding the truth.
She says she entrusted the child to God, saying “Don’t you believe in Providence?”

At the medical base, Beaulieu is getting ready to finally leave the area.
The Master of Novices brings three babies to the base to protect them from the Abbess.
Beaulieu first notices that many orphans living on the street have been helping personnel at the base from time to time.

It occurs to her that the nuns could start raising many of these children and open an orphanage, thus avoiding questions about where the babies are coming from.
One of the nuns decides to leave the convent and raise her own child, and another decides to leave, but allow her baby to be raised by the nuns.


Source: “The Innocents (2016 film)”
Free encyclopedia Wikipedia

Oh. . . What a heart-wrenching story it is!

Yes, it is. . . Anyway, it is said that Soviet troops rushed to the abbey and raped them one after another. . . Ten months later, many of them would give birth in the last month. . .

 


(inno05.jpg)

 

It looks like the convent has become a nursery. . .

In other words, Kato, are you defending the Japanese army who was to blame for the so-called “comfort woman” problem?

Oh no, I am NOT. . . But, I’d say that the above tragedy was much worse than the “comfort woman” problem. . . Don’t you thin so, Diane?

Well. . . The so-called “comfort woman” problem seems as bad as the above unknown tragedy.

Anyway, I’m NOT defending the Japanese army nor the Soviet Union army who did those bad things, but I’d say that during the war there were so many rapes in any of occupied countries. . . Even now, there has been news that Syrian government forces did “systematic rape”.

No kidding!?

If you cannot believe, read the following article.

UN probe accuses Syrian troops

of ‘systematic’ rape

 


(bomb001.jpg)

 

2018/03/16

Syrian troops and government-linked militia have systematically used rape and sexual violence against civilians, atrocities that amount to crimes against humanity, a UN-backed inquiry said Thursday, reports AFP.

Rebel fighters have committed similar violations, amounting to war crimes, but at a rate “considerably less common than rape by government forces and associated militia”, the Independent International Commission of Inquiry for Syria (COI) said in a new report.

The findings, submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Council, are based on 454 interviews with sources that include survivors, eye witnesses and medical workers.
The Damascus government has never granted COI investigators access to Syria.

Overall, the report adds to the overwhelming accounts of hellish suffering endured by Syrian civilians during the conflict that has claimed more than 350,000 lives as it enters its eighth year.

A woman from Syria’s third city of Homs told COI investigators that in 2012 “government forces entered her home and raped her daughter in front of her and her husband before shooting the daughter and the father”, the report said.

“The mother was then raped by two soldiers,” it added, in one of many examples of extreme violence.

Checkpoints controlled by the government or its allies, as well as detention centres, were identified as a main areas where sexual violence was perpetrated.

The COI notes that government troops detained “thousands of women and girls” from 2011 to the end of 2017, the period covered in the report.


SOURCE: Daily-Sun News

So, Kato, you defend the Japanese army because they resorted to “comfort women” so that they didn’t have to rape the women in the occupied countries, don’t you?

No, I don’t. . . I am not admiring the “comfort women system”. . .

So how come you let me know about the rapes of the Soviet Union army in Poland?

Well . . . , even the German troops had raped the Russian women during the Soviet invasion.

Oh really?

Yes, they did. . . Besides, even the American troops had raped the French women during and after the Normandy landing operation.

The Dark Side of Liberation

 


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By Jennifer Schuessler
May 20, 2013

 

The soldiers who landed in Normandy on D-Day were greeted as liberators, but by the time American G.I.’s were headed back home in late 1945, many French citizens viewed them in a very different light.

In the port city of Le Havre, the mayor was bombarded with letters from angry residents complaining about drunkenness, jeep accidents, sexual assault — “a regime of terror,” as one put it, “imposed by bandits in uniform.”

This isn’t the “greatest generation” as it has come to be depicted in popular histories.
But in “What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American G.I. in World War II France,” the historian Mary Louise Roberts draws on French archives, American military records, wartime propaganda and other sources to advance a provocative argument: The liberation of France was “sold” to soldiers not as a battle for freedom but as an erotic adventure among oversexed Frenchwomen, stirring up a “tsunami of male lust” that a battered and mistrustful population often saw as a second assault on its sovereignty and dignity.

“I could not believe what I was reading,” Ms. Roberts, a professor of French history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, recalled of the moment she came across the citizen complaints in an obscure archive in Le Havre.
“I took out my little camera and began photographing the pages. I did not go to the bathroom for eight hours.”

“What Soldiers Do,” to be officially published next month by the University of Chicago Press, arrives just as sexual misbehavior inside the military is high on the national agenda, thanks to a recent Pentagon report estimating that some 26,000 service members had been sexually assaulted in 2012, more than a one-third increase since 2010.

While Ms. Roberts’s arguments may be a hard sell to readers used to more purely heroic narratives, her book is winning praise from some scholarly colleagues.
“Our culture has embalmed World War II as ‘the good war,’ and we don’t revisit the corpse very often,” said David M. Kennedy, a historian at Stanford University and the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book “Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945.”

“What Soldiers Do,” he added, is “a breath of fresh air,” providing less of an “aha” than, as he put it, an “of course.”

Mary Louise Roberts has written “What Soldiers Do,” a book about sexual assaults by Americans fighting in France.

Ms. Roberts, whose parents met in 1944 when her father was training as a naval officer, emphasizes that American soldiers’ heroism and sacrifice were very real, and inspired genuine gratitude.
But French sources, she argues, also reveal deep ambivalence on the part of the liberated.

“Struggles between American and French officials over sex,” she writes, “rekindled the unresolved question of who exactly was in charge.”

Sex was certainly on the liberators’ minds.
The book cites military propaganda and press accounts depicting France as “a tremendous brothel inhabited by 40 million hedonists,” as Life magazine put it.
(Sample sentences from a French phrase guide in the newspaper Stars and Stripes: “You are very pretty” and “Are your parents at home?”)

On the ground, however, the grateful kisses captured by photojournalists gave way to something less picturesque.
In the National Archives in College Park, Md., Ms. Roberts found evidence — including one blurry, curling snapshot — supporting long-circulating colorful anecdotes about the Blue and Gray Corral, a brothel set up near the village of St. Renan in September 1944 by Maj. Gen. Charles H. Gerhardt, commander of the infantry division that landed at Omaha Beach, partly to counter a wave of rape accusations against G.I.’s.
(It was shut down after a mere five hours.)

In France, Ms. Roberts also found a desperate letter from the mayor of Le Havre in August 1945 urging American commanders to set up brothels outside the city, to halt the “scenes contrary to decency” that overran the streets, day and night.
They refused, partly, Ms. Roberts argues, out of concern that condoning prostitution would look bad to “American mothers and sweethearts,” as one soldier put it.

Keeping G.I. sex hidden from the home front, she writes, ensured that it would be on full public view in France: a “two-sided attitude,” she said, that is reflected in the current military sexual abuse crisis.

Ms. Roberts is not the first scholar to bring the sexual side of World War II into clearer view.
The 1990s brought a surge of scholarship on the Soviet Army’s mass rapes on the Eastern front, fed partly by the international campaign to have rape recognized as a war crime after the conflict in the former Yugoslavia.
At the same time, gender historians began taking a closer look at “fraternization” by American soldiers, with particular attention to what women thought they were getting out of the bargain.


SOURCE: NY TIMES article

Besides, although the Nazi Jewish extermination and slaughter operations are notorious and well known to the world, the systematic slaughter that the former Soviet Union did against Ukrainians was hardly known until recently.

Oh . . .? Are you saying, Kato, the high-level executives of the former Soviet Union had systematically slaughtered Ukrainians?

Yes, they did. . . Actually, I didn’t even know at all until recently, but I watched the following documentary. . .

 


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“Zoom in”

“The actual page”


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My Comment

May 27, 2019

Directed by Yurij Luhovy in 2010, this 76-minute documentary delves into genocide against the Ukrainian nation with declassified rare footage while interviewing survivors and historians.

The Holodomor (killing by starvation) took place in Soviet Ukraine in 1932 and 1933 that killed millions of Ukraines.

During the Holodomor, millions of people of Ukraine, the majority of who were ethnic ethnic Ukrainians, died of starvation in a peacetime catastrophe unprecedented in the history of Ukraine.

Since 2006, the Holodomor has been recognized by Ukraine and 15 other countries as a genocide of the Ukrainian people carried out by the Soviet government.

Amazing, shocking and heart-wrenching!

 

Holodomor

 


(genocide92.jpg)

 

The Holodomor (derived from морити голодом, “to kill by starvation”) was a man-made famine in Soviet Ukraine in 1932 and 1933 that killed millions of Ukrainians.
It is also known as the Terror-Famine and Famine-Genocide in Ukraine, and sometimes referred to as the Great Famine or The Ukrainian Genocide of 1932–33.

It was part of the wider Soviet famine of 1932–33, which affected the major grain-producing areas of the country.
During the Holodomor, millions of inhabitants of Ukraine, the majority of whom were ethnic Ukrainians, died of starvation in a peacetime catastrophe unprecedented in the history of Ukraine.

Since 2006, the Holodomor has been recognized by Ukraine and 15 other countries as a genocide of the Ukrainian people carried out by the Soviet government.

Early estimates of the death toll by scholars and government officials varied greatly.
According to higher estimates, up to 12 million ethnic Ukrainians were said to have perished as a result of the famine.

A U.N. joint statement signed by 25 countries in 2003 declared that 7–10 million perished.
Research has since narrowed the estimates to between 3.3 and 7.5 million.
According to the findings of the Court of Appeal of Kiev in 2010, the demographic losses due to the famine amounted to 10 million, with 3.9 million direct famine deaths, and a further 6.1 million birth deficits.

Some scholars believe that the famine was planned by Joseph Stalin to eliminate a Ukrainian independence movement.
Using Holodomor in reference to the famine emphasises its man-made aspects, arguing that actions such as rejection of outside aid, confiscation of all household foodstuffs, and restriction of population movement confer intent, defining the famine as genocide; the loss of life has been compared to that of the Holocaust.
The causes are still a subject of academic debate, and some historians dispute its characterization as a genocide.


Source: “Holodomor”
Free encyclopedia Wikipedia”

Oh. . . How horrible! . . . Four to fourteen million Ukrainians died because they were deprived of livestock and farmland by forced relocation. . . It sounds much worse than the Holocaust by the Nazi, doesn’t it?

I suppose so. . . Horodomor is one of the biggest tragedies of the 20th century. . . There were others such as the Armenian massacre, the Holocaust, the Pol Poto massacre, the Rwanda massacre, etc.! . . . In other words, historically, wars and dictators have produced tragedies all over the world

I see. . .

At the time of the Communist Party dictatorship in general, and Mao Zedong in particular, China’s “Great Leap Forward” (1958-1962) was a reckless plan, which resulted in 10 million people dead. . . Moreover, even in North Korea, a former BBC reporter, British journalist Jasper Becker, points out based on data from the UN that the population of North Korea was 24 million, but in 2005 it dropped to 19 million. . . That is, five million North Koreans were starved to death in just 10 years. . .

Unbelievable! . . . Both wars and dictators create such horrible tragedies, huh?

Yes, you’re telling me.


(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

Do you think that both wars and dictators create such horrible tragedies, too?

What? . . . You don’t like to talk about tragedies at all, do you?

“Tell me another interesting story!”

If you say so, I’ll show you the following clip:

Here’s a clip for a certain woman to use for making love.

 


(sexygal2.jpg)

 

How do you like the above music?

Are you tired of sexy music?

Well… here’s a mood-changing tune just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)


(1001nite10.jpg)

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


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使ってない単語

 

使ってない単語

 

NIXED

 


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こんにちは。デンマンです。
僕はもう、英語を海外で30年近く使っているのですよう。
でもね、それでも使ってない単語ってありますね。


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2008年の6月18日にAOL のニュースを見ていたら、この記事が画面に出てきたのですよう。
nix という単語は名詞だとばっかり思っていたのですよ。
つまり、 nil と同じような意味だと思っていたのです。
要するに、「無い」 とか 「ゼロ」 という意味です。

動詞として使う事ができるなんて全く知らなかった。
動詞として使えば、「無視する」というような意味だろうと思ったのです。

念のために僕がいつも使っている ポップアップ英英辞典 (http://wordweb.info) で調べたら、やっぱり名詞は出ていたけれど、動詞としては載っていなかった。

本文を読んだら次のように書いてありました。

Muslims Denied Seat at Obama Rally

Source: The Associated Press
Posted: 06/18/2008 5:13PM
Filed Under: World
DETROIT (AP)

A young Muslim woman said she and another woman were refused seats directly behind Barack Obama — and in front of TV cameras — at a Detroit rally because they wear head scarfs.

イスラム教信者の女性がバラック・オバマ氏のすぐ後ろの席に着くことを拒否された、と言うのですね。
つまり、nixed が「拒否される」、「拒絶される」と言う意味で使われているようです。

英語を使いながら、海外で暮らしていても、本当に毎日が勉強です。

英語は国際語ですよね。
あなたも英語をおさらいしてみませんか?

ええっ? 時間もないしお金もないの?
だったらね、時間がなくてもお金がなくても勉強できる方法を教えますよ。

どうすればいいのかって。。。?
次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『あなたの国際化をサポートしてくれる

無料英語学習サービス』

ネットをやっているあなたなら、いつでもどこでも無料で国際語を勉強する事が出来ます。
明日から始めることが出来ますよ。
いろいろなコースがあります。
例えば、科学用語だとか。。。
ビジネス用語だとか。。。
僕は俗語を選択しています。
あなたも好きなコースを選ぶ事ができますよ。

では、今日のホットな情報です。

今日のホットでお得な情報

ジューンさんの熟女下着 June Adams 下着美人
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あなたが本当に

美しくやせるために…


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あなたは、美しくやせたいと思いますか?
ええっ?
何度も試したけれど、ダメだったの?

だったらね、あなたでもやって行けるダイエットを紹介します。

ウソだ~♪~い???

ウソじゃないのよう!
とにかく、始める前から、そのように消極的じゃダメなのよう。
だからね、ぜひ一歩を踏み出すためにも次のリンクをクリックして覗いてみてね。

■ 『あなたでも無理なくできるダイエット ガイド』

万里の道も一歩からですからね。
じゃあ、頑張ってね。


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英語の勉強に疲れたら、
あなたのダイエットについて考えてみたら。。。?

時間があったらぜひ覗いてみてください。
では、幸運を祈ってます。


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ィ~ハァ~♪~!

メチャ面白い、

ためになる関連記事


平成の紫式部、橘卑弥子でござ~ます
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『卑弥子の源氏物語』

『平成の紫式部』

■ めれんげさんの『即興の詩』

■ めれんげさんの『極私的詩集』


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■ 『ちょっと変わった 新しい古代日本史』


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■ 『きれいになったと感じさせる

下着・ランジェリーを見つけませんか?』

『センスあるランジェリー』

■ 『面白くて楽しいレンゲ物語』

■ 『カナダのバーナビーと軽井沢に

別荘を持つことを夢見る小百合さんの物語』

■ 『今すぐに役立つホットな情報』

■ 『 ○ 笑う者には福が来る ○ 』


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平成の紫式部、橘卑弥子でござ~ます
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おほほほほ。。。

卑弥子でござ~♪~ますわよ。

くどいようですけれど、

また現れましたわ。

やっぱり、デンマンさん

ぱっかりに任せていると

退屈するのよねぇ~。

それで。。。つい、つい、

出て来てしまうので

ござ~♪~ますわよ。

ええっ、余計な事は言わなくてもいいから、

さっさと言いたいことを言って消えろ!

あららあああぁ~

あなたはそのような厳しいことをあたくしに

言うのでござ~♪~ますか?

いけすかないことォ~♪~

分かりましたわ。

では、今日の一言を。。。

うふふふふ。。。

You can’t build a reputation on

what you are going to do.

— Henry Ford


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これからする事で名声を築く事はできない。

(これまでの実績で名声は生まれる。)

あたくしは、このように訳しました。

あなたなら、どう訳しますか?

素晴しい訳があったら教えてくださいませ。

ヘンリー・フォードさんは、あなたも知っていますよね。

アメリカの自動車王です。

では、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあ、バ~♪~イ。


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Quartet

 

Quartet

 


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Kato, did you attend your friend’s wedding recently, huh?


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No, I didn’t… Why do you ask me such a question?

Well…, it’s obvious that you’ve pasted a clip of Johann Pachelbel’s 《Canon in D Major》, which has been used frequently in weddings these days.

I see… Diane, you’re quite knowledgeable about today’s wedding fad, eh?

It’s commen sense, isn’t it?

Oh…? I didn’t know that.

Then how come you pasted the above photo of the wedding string quartet?

Well…, I’ve recently watched the following movie:

 


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“Enlarge it!”

“Actual Page”

My Comment

 

Directed by Dustin Hoffman in 2011 based on the play Quartet by Ronald Harwood, this British drama depicts the lives at Beecham House—a retirement home for former professional musicians, patterned after the real-life Casa di Riposo per Musicisti founded by Giuseppe Verdi.

 


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Although the cultured Englishfolk live peacefully in a beautifully maintained residence for retired musicians, the film lacks a real drama with turns and twists.

The story appears predictable and lack-lustre.

 

Quartet

 


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PLOT

 

The drama takes place in Beecham House, where live Reg, Wilf and Cissy who often worked together in the past.

Among other residents are Cedric Livingstone, a former director, and diva Anne Langley.

All the guests in the retirement home continue to be engaged in their former professions in one way or the other, including lecturing and initiating young people to music.

Finances threaten closure of the home, but proceeds from a yearly gala concert on Verdi’s birthday hold hope for a continuation of the place.

However, Cedric has become rather desperate because some of the most prominent singers have either died or decided not to participate at all.

Reg, Wilf and Cissy were in the cast of a very highly rated recording of the opera Rigoletto, which includes a famous quartet for soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor and baritone (“Bella figlia dell’amore”).

This version is very prominent among opera buffs as “the Rigoletto” of the post-war era.

One day, Reg is shocked to find his former wife Jean Horton, the missing soprano of the Rigoletto recording, turning up to live at Beecham House.

Reg is angry not to have been warned as their parting was on very sour terms.

At first, Jean tries unsuccessfully to mend things with Reg.

In the ensuing conversations her infidelity arises, as well as her past marriages, but Reg comes to understand that all that is past.

In the meantime, Wilf and Cissy convince Cedric that bringing together those who sang the quartet on the famous recording to sing it again for the Verdi Gala concert will sell enough tickets to save the home.

Enchanted with the idea, they persuade Reg to overcome his objections to performing with Jean again.

However, she is harder to persuade as she vowed never to sing again after retiring.

Cissy takes Jean flowers from the garden to cheer her up, and asks if she wishes to discuss the quartet, but Jean becomes violent and attacks Cissy, which only aggravates Cissy’s already delicate senile condition.

Jean apologises and is finally persuaded to sing in the quartet from Rigoletto, after learning that Anne Langley will be singing “Vissi d’arte” from Tosca.

The group prepares for their performance and, moments before their curtain call, Cissy gets very confused and attempts to walk out the door, saying that she has to go back to her family, but Jean manages to salvage the situation.

During her conversation with Cissy, Jean expresses regret for all her past bad behaviour towards Reg and admits that she is still in love with him.

Reg overhears this.

Just as the recital is about to start, the director of the home is amazed at the energy displayed by the guests of the home.

The idea of rehearsing and playing before an audience brings life back to them, leading her to the conclusion that old age and art go together.


SOURCE: “Quartet (2012 film)”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I see… So, you viewed the above movie on May 14, didn’t you?

Yes, I did… and I jotted down the above comment.

Kato, you wrote down, “The film lacks a real drama with turns and twists. The story appears predictable and lack-lustre.”

Yes, I did… Is there anything wrong with my impression?

Well…, I see some romance among the residents… Don’t you think that’s good enough for the elder folks?

I don’t think so… I wanna see more excitement and surprise in the movie.

Like what?

You know… The above movie was directed by Dustin Hoffman, who got an inspiration viewing the following documentary:

 


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“Enlarge it!”

“Actual Page”

 


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My Comment

 

Directed by Daniel Schmid in 1984, this 87-minute Italian documentary depicts the lives at the Casa di Riposo per Musicisti of Milan, the world’s first nursing home for retired opera singers, founded by composer Giuseppe Verdi in 1896.

 


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Dustin Hoffman cited this film as a direct inspiration for his 2012 film “Quartet”.

If you’re a music lover in general and an opera fan in particular, this is a must-see.

So, Kato, you’re saying that the documentary appears much better than Hoffman’s movie, huh?

Yes, that’s quite right… You see, all the people in the documentary are real people, I mean, the retired opera singers and musicians who sing arias and play the music marvellously—even after their retirement… I was thrilled and fascinated—this excitement and fascination, which I couldn’t get from the Hoffman movie, seems like a rare godsend.

Kato, you’re exaggerating!

Oh, am I?

So, you’ve just brought up the above title—just to tell me about your excitement and fascination, huh?

Well…, there’s more to it.

What else are you talking about?

The Casa di Riposo per Musicisti of Milan is the world’s first nursing home for retired opera singers, founded by composer Giuseppe Verdi in 1896… Diane, do you know him?

I have never met him, but I know that he composed the world famous opera 《Aida》…


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Set in the Old Kingdom of Egypt, it was commissioned by Cairo’s Khedivial Opera House and had its première there on 24 December 1871, in a performance conducted by Giovanni Bottesini.

Today the work holds a central place in the operatic canon, receiving performances every year around the world.

At New York’s Metropolitan Opera alone, Aida has been sung more than 1,100 times since 1886.

Ghislanzoni’s scheme follows a scenario often attributed to the French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, but Verdi biographer Mary Jane Phillips-Matz argues that the source is actually Temistocle Solera.

 

Setting

The libretto does not specify a precise time period, so it is difficult to place the opera more specifically than the Old Kingdom.

For the first production, Mariette went to great efforts to make the sets and costumes authentic.

Given the consistent artistic styles throughout the 3000-year history of ancient Egypt, a given production does not particularly need to choose a specific time period within the larger frame of ancient Egyptian history.

 

Backstory

The Egyptians have captured and enslaved Aida, an Ethiopian princess.

An Egyptian military commander, Radamès, struggles to choose between his love for her and his loyalty to the King of Egypt.

To complicate the story further, the King’s daughter Amneris is in love with Radamès, although he does not return her feelings.


SOURCE: “Aida”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So, Diane, you love his opera, eh?

Yes, I do.

Do you know, Diane, Giuseppe Verdi was an intensely private person?

Oh…, in what way?

Giuseppe Verdi

 


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10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901

 

He was born near Busseto to a provincial family of moderate means, and developed a musical education with the help of a local patron.
Verdi came to dominate the Italian opera scene after the era of Vincenzo Bellini, Gaetano Donizetti, and Gioachino Rossini, whose works significantly influenced him.

By his 30s, he had become one of the pre-eminent opera composers in history.

In his early operas, Verdi demonstrated a sympathy with the Risorgimento movement which sought the unification of Italy.
He also participated briefly as an elected politician.

 

Personality

Not all of Verdi’s personal qualities were amiable.

John Rosselli concluded after writing his biography that “I do not very much like the man Verdi, in particular the autocratic rentier-cum-estate owner, part-time composer, and seemingly full-time grumbler and reactionary critic of the later years”, yet admits that like other writers, he must “admire him, warts and all…a deep integrity runs beneath his life, and can be felt even when he is being unreasonable or wrong.

Budden suggests that “With Verdi…the man and the artist on many ways developed side by side.” Ungainly and awkward in society in his early years,
“as he became a man of property and underwent the civilizing influence of Giuseppina,…[he] acquired assurance and authority.”

He also learnt to keep himself to himself, never discussing his private life and maintaining when it suited his convenience legends about his supposed ‘peasant’ origins, his materialism and his indifference to criticism.

Mendelsohn describes the composer as “an intensely private man who deeply resented efforts to inquire into his personal affairs.

He regarded journalists and would-be biographers, as well as his neighbors in Busseto and the operatic public at large, as an intrusive lot, against whose prying attentions he needed constantly to defend himself.”

Verdi was similarly never explicit about his religious beliefs.
Anti-clerical by nature in his early years, he nonetheless built a chapel at Sant’Agata, but is rarely recorded as going to church.

Strepponi wrote in 1871 “I won’t say [Verdi] is an atheist, but he is not much of a believer.”

 

Verdi today

The music of Verdi can still evoke a range of cultural and political resonances.

Excerpts from the Requiem were featured at the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997.

 


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SOURCE: “Giuseppe Verdi”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I see… Not all of Verdi’s personal qualities were amiable. Verdi is NOT an atheist, but he is not much of a believer… Yet he founded the world’s first nursing home for retired opera singers… Why is that?

Well…, it says that a deep integrity runs beneath his life, and can be felt even when he is being unreasonable or wrong. His generosity and benevolence has something to do with his deep integrity, I suppose.

I see… So his deep integrity made him found the world’s first nursing home for retired opera singers, huh?

Yes, it did, I suppose.


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【Himiko’s Monologue】


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Do you think that Giuseppe Verdi was actually a generous pesron with goodwill?

What? You don’t really care about it, do you?

“Tell me another interesting story!”

If you say so, I’ll show you the following clip:

Here’s a clip for a certain woman to use for making love.

 


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How do you like the above music?

Are you tired of sexy music?

Well… here’s a mood-changing tune just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


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  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


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If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


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“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


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Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


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Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


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Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love


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Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


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『Actual List』


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Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


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The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


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ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


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(girlxx.gif)