Banana @ Eden

Banana @ Eden


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Kato, did you dream of eating a banana in the Garden of Eden last night?

No, I didn’t.

Then how come you pasted the above picture? You and Eve seem to have found a lot of bananas in such a romantic dream.

Diane, have you ever heard of a true story in which Adam and Eve ate a banana instead of an apple?

No kidding!

I’m not joking nor jesting.  I’m dead serious!

Kato, are you out of your mind?  All the Christians have been believing for centuries that Adam and Eve ate an apple in the Garden of Eden.  If you say this nonsense, you’re gonna be a laughingstock on the Net.

I know, I know…, but what I’m saying is true.

You must be out of your mind, Kato.  Why don’t you wake up and wash your face again in the ice-cold water?

So, Diane, you don’t believe me, do you?

Nobody believes you, Kato.  What the heck makes you think so?

Actually, I borrowed a translated version of the best-seller called “Banana.”

I see … so you’ve simply gone bananas after reading it, haven’t you?

Well … Diane, at least, you’ve got a good sense of humor … laughx.gif

Kato, do you really believe such a foolish story?

Yes, I do. . . This isn’t a foolish story.  Look at the following catalogue page.

 


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“Actual Library catalogue”

 

I see… so, Kato, you’ve read the Japanese version, haven’t you?

Yes, I have.  The above book is one of the best non-fiction books I’ve ever read in my life.

Do you really mean it, Kato?

Yes, of course, I do.  Why don’t you borrow and read it once the library acquires its English version.

Kato, have you already reserved it?

Oh, yes, I have.  By the way, Diane, do you know who told the world in the first place that Adam and Eve ate an apple in the Garden of Eden?

No, I don’t. . . Who did?

The book says, the first person said the darned thing is Saint Jerome.

 


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This man was born in Dalmatia in 340 AD. Parents were Christians, but he wasn’t interested in Christianity himself.  He went to Rome simply because he wanted to study philosophy and rhetoric.

Then why did he get involved in the Bible?

Good question! … While he studied Greek and devoted himself to the study of classics in Anatolia and Gaul, he got seriously ill around 373, in Antioch.  This illness made him devote his life to the study of theology.  Then he learned Hebrew while living in the desert of Syria, and decided to immerse himself in a project to translate the old Bible into Latin. The book also tells the following story.

 

The Pope ordered Jerome to translate the Bible, and he just did it in Rome.
After this translation, the Bible came to be read by more people.
During the following six centuries, the Bible began to be translated in other languages.

Then, in 1455, Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing machine, which made it possible that the Bible came to be printed in large quantities for the first time.
The Gutenberg Bible was an exact copy of the faithful Latin translation made by Jerome a thousand years ago.

As in English, Latin is a language in which there are homonyms that share the same pronunciation but have different meanings.
When Jerome translated the Hebrew word “fruit of knowledge of good and evil” into Latin, he picked “malum” for it.

According to the biblical archaeologist Shuneia Levin, its meaning is close to “malicious.”
“Malum” can also be translated as “apple” since it is a word derived from the Greek word “melon” that originally means “apple.”

The Renaissance painters who read the Gutenberg Bible interpreted the word to refer to apple, and began to draw an apple, instead of a banana, in a picture of the Garden of Eden.


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“Adam and Eve” by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1526.
He should’ve put bananas, instead of apples.

(translated by Kato)


SOURCE: 23-25ページ 『バナナの世界史』
著者: ダン・コッペル 訳者: 黒川由美
2012年6月3日 第1版第2刷発行
発行所: 株式会社 太田出版
“Banana” by Dan Koeppel

 

But I’m still in doubt.

I can understand your doubt.  Let me ask you this question.

What is it?

Where is the Garden of Eden?

I think it was somewhere in the Middle East.

According to the Book of Genesis, the Garden of Eden was surrounded by four rivers—the Tigris, the Euphrates, the Pishon, and the Gihon. In the early 1980s, using satellite-captured pictures, an archaeologist located the Pison and the Gihon, which are now at the bottom of the Persian Gulf. In the old days, the Garden was climatically well-suited for bananas, but not for apples. Even today, the Middle East is well-known as one of the main producers for bananas, but not apples.

 


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But you can find apples even in the Middle East.

I know, but not many apples.  As a matter of fact, in old days, they couldn’t grow apples in the Middle East.  Only with the modern technology can they grow apples nowadays over there.

I see… Tell me, Kato, who on earth drew an apple in the picture of the Garden of Eden for the first time?

Hugo van der Goes did.

 


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Hugo van der Goes

(Circa 1440 – 1482)

Painter of early Flemish school.
Born in or near Ghent, van der Goes was enlisted as a member of the painters’ guild of Ghent as a master in 1467.
The following year he was involved in the decoration of the town of Bruges in celebration of the marriage between Charles the Bold and Margaret of York.
He provided heraldic decorations for Charles the Bold’s Joyous Entry to Ghent in 1469 and later in 1472.
He was dean of the Guild of Saint Luke in Ghent from 1474 till 1476.


SOURCE: “Hugo van der Goes”
Free encyclopedia “Wikipedia (Wikipedia)”

 

Because van der Gose painted apples in the Garden of Eden, the people who saw his picture came to believe that Adam and Eve ate an apple, instead of a banana.  Since then, almost all the painters drew apples in the picture of “Adam and Eve.”

 



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ADAM AND EVE by Jan (Mabuse) Gossaert (1478-1532)


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Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1533),
the German Renaissance painter.


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ADAM AND EVE by Hans Baldung Grien (1484-1545)


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ADAM AND EVE by Tintoretto (1518-1594)
The Fall of Man, c. 1550
Canvas, 150×220 cm
Galleria dell’Accademia, Venice


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ADAM AND EVE by Hendrik Goltzius (1558-1617)


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ADAM AND EVE by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)


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ADAM AND EVE by Hans Thoma (1839-1924)


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ADAM AND EVE by Maurice Denis (1870-1943)

 

For more than four centuries, the painters have drawn apples in the picture of Adam and Eve.

Then who the heck started to tell the world that Adam and Eve ate a banana, not an apple?

The man in the following picture did.

 


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Who on earth is this man?

You might’ve heard of his name, Diane.  His name is Carl Linne, the naturalist who was born in 1707 and died in 1778.  He is world-famous called the “father of modern taxonomy.”

I think I heard his name in my biology class at high school.  So he started to tell the world that Adam and Eve ate a banana, not an apple, didn’t he?

I do not know whether or not he educated the Pope.  In any case, Linne was a devoted Christian, and believed that it was God’s calling for him to make a perfect inventory on the creation of God.  Moreover, Linne believed the existence of Eden as well as that of bananas.  You can find the following interesting passage in the book.

 

The yellow sweet banana was gaven the scientific name of “Musa sapentium” from the Latin word which means “knowledge” after the tree of wisdom that knows good and evil.
In addition, the green banana (a.k.a “plantain” used as a cooking) was named “Musa paradisiaca,” that is, “banana paradise.”

Genus “Musa” that Linne named comes from the Arabic word “mauz,” which means the banana.
It is understandable because bananas appear in the holy garden depicted in the Koran—the holy scriptures of Islam written in Arabic.

In the Koran, the tree in the forbidden Eden is called “talh,” which is usually translated as “tree in a paradise,” or more directly “banana tree.”

The scriptures of Islam indicates, “The fruit grows abundantly in the shade of luxuriant foliage… and you can see the fruit in all the year round.”
This depiction certainly matches the way bananas grow in the tree.


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(translated by Kato)


SOURCE: 24-26ページ 『バナナの世界史』
著者: ダン・コッペル 訳者: 黒川由美
2012年6月3日 第1版第2刷発行
発行所: 株式会社 太田出版
“Banana” by Dan Koeppel

 

I see… Bananas appear in the Koran, don’t they?

That’s right.  The scriptures of both Islam and Christianity come from the Old Testament.  Diane, look at the following picture of “Adam and Eve” again.

 


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Adam and Eve are hiding their private parts with the fig leaf.

Yes, I can see that.  So what?

Why the fig leaf?  Diane, have you ever wondered how come both of them had to hide with the fig leaf—among all other leaves?

 


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Well … I suppose there was a fig tree nearby, so they happened to pick its leaves.

Take a close look at the fig leaf.  There are some slits in the leaf.  You can see the private parts through the open gaps, can’t you?

That is because you’re so keen to take a close look at those parts. gyaha.gif

I’m not so keen, Diane.  Look!  The private parts are visible through the open gaps.  You see… both ate an apple from the tree, so it is natural for them to pick up leaves from the apple tree.  Don’t you think so?  Yet, they hide their parts with the fig leaf.  It is unnatural, isn’t it?

I see… it would be more natural for them to pick up some leaves from the apple tree—not from the fig tree.

Yes, that’s what I’m talking about.

Maybe, a fig tree happened to grow by the apple tree.

It sounds too contrived.  People wouldn’t believe that, I guess.

Kato, you don’t like fig trees, do you?

Yes, I like those, but as a matter of fact, in the ancient days, a banana was called “fig.”

No kidding!

I’m dead serious.  The above book says that Alexander the Great sent a letter to Aristotle about the discovery of “fig” when he saw bananas in India.

 


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When the Spanish explorers came across bananas in the New World, they recorded those bananas as “the fig.”

But, I can’t still believe that “fig” in old days means “banana.”

Believe me, Diane.  They say, “Those who believe are saved.”

Only the Japanese believe it, I guess.

To tell you the truth, in the ancient Hebrew, a banana was called the “fig.”  Besides, the forbidden fruit is written as the “fig of Eve”—that is, banana of Eve.

I still can’t believe this.

Diane, look at the following picture!

 


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This is a conclusive evidence because a banana leaf is much better than a fig leaf when you hide your private parts.  A fig leaf is not big enough to hide your pussy.

 


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【Himiko’s Monologue】


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Well…, what do you think about a fig leaf in front of your private parts?

Now I can see that a banana leaf is much better if you hide your private parts.

Don’t you think so?

Anyway, here is an untold story about the Garden of Eden.

 


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In any case, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


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If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following articles:


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Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor

Popes@Spotlight

Fireflies

Richard III

Savage vs. Civilized

Submerging Island

Adele Hugo


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Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


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『Actual List』


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Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001st movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


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The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


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ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


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Adele Hugo

 

Adele Hugo

 


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Kato, who is Adele Hugo?


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Diane, have you ever heard of Victor Hugo?

Yes, of course I have… He is one of the world-famous French writers, isn’t he?

So, you know about him, don’t you?… Actually, I’ve written an article about him and his famous novel.


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『パリの日本人』(A Japanese in Paris)

It is written in Japanese… So, unfortunately, you cannot read it… Anyway, in the above article I talked about his famous novel—“The Hunchback of Notre Dame.”  Diane, have you read the novel?

Yes, I read it a long time ago.

By the way, Diane, have you watched the following movie?

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Trailer (1939)


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No, I haven’t, but I viewed the following musical:


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So, Diane, you like musicals, eh?

Yes, I do… Talking about Victor Hugo, is he famous even in Japan?

Oh, yes!  When I was a kid, I read a story about the struggles of ex-convict Jean Valjean.


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Did you like it?

I didn’t like it too much, but one scene was clearly implanted into my mind.

What kind of scene is that?

Well… Valjean, using the alias Monsieur Madeleine, has become a wealthy factory owner and is appointed mayor of a certain town. Walking down the street, he sees a man named Fauchelevent pinned under the wheels of a cart. When no one volunteers to lift the cart, even for pay, he decides to rescue Fauchelevent himself. He crawls underneath the cart, manages to lift it, and frees him.


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The town’s police inspector, Inspector Javert, who was an adjutant guard at the Bagne of Toulon during Valjean’s incarceration, becomes suspicious of the mayor after witnessing this remarkable feat of strength. He has known only one other man, a convict named Jean Valjean, who could accomplish it.


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How old were you when you read it for the first time.

I was ten or eleven years old, I suppose.

So, you were an avid reader, eh?

No, not really… in those days, the story of Jean Valjean was quite popular among the children of my age… so, naturally it interested me to a great extent.

Kato, have you watched the movie lately?

Not recently, but I watched it a few years ago.


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“Actual Page”

So, you watched it on April 8, 2016, huh? … How did you like it?


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I wasn’t impressed so much as I read the original story.

Talkng about Adele Hugo, is she related to Victor Hugo?

Yes, of course, she is the youndest daughter of Victor Hugo.

Adèle Hugo


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(28 July 1830 – 21 April 1915)

 

Adèle Hugo was the fifth and youngest child of French writer Victor Hugo.
She is remembered for developing schizophrenia as a young woman, which led to a romantic obsession with a British military officer who rejected her.
Her story has been retold in film and books, such as “The Story of Adele H.

Childhood

Adèle Hugo was raised in a cultured, affluent home in Paris, the youngest child of Adèle (née Foucher) and Victor Hugo, France’s most famous writer.


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Adèle Foucher

Adèle enjoyed playing the piano, and was known for her beauty and long dark hair.
She sat for portraits by several well-known Parisian artists.

In 1851, the Hugo family moved to the island of Jersey, after Victor Hugo was forced into political exile.
The family remained on the Channel Islands until 1870.
It was in Jersey that Adèle met Albert Pinson, the object of her obsession.

Illness and pursuit of Albert Pinson

Signs of mental illness became apparent in Adèle in 1856.
Adèle became romantically involved with a British army officer, Albert Pinson.

Pinson proposed marriage to Adèle in 1855, but she rejected the proposal.
Adèle had a change of heart, wanting to reconcile with Pinson, but he refused to be involved any further with Adèle.
Pinson continued his military career, being sent to the Sixteenth Foot Regiment in Bedfordshire in 1856, where he seldom saw Adèle.
Pinson then went to Ireland in 1858, upon promotion to lieutenant, where he was stationed until 1861.

Despite Pinson’s rejection, she continued pursuing him.
Pinson developed a reputation for living a “life of debauchery”.

Adèle followed him when he was stationed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1863.
Adèle’s family worried for her well-being, and tried to track her whereabouts by letters.

In 1866, Pinson was stationed to Barbados, the British colonial centre in the Caribbean region.
He completely abandoned Adèle when he left Barbados in 1869.
Adèle did not find her way back to France until 1872, and in the interim, the Hugo family was unable to track her activities.

The mystery of Adèle’s life in Barbados may have been revealed in an anonymous letter to the editor—signed only “P”—published in the New-York Tribune on May 27, 1885.
The head of the Catholic mission in Trinidad, Cathonoy, gave a similar account of Adèle’s wretched situation in Barbados in a letter dated September 8, 1885.
He relates an incident where he met a Barbadian woman of African descent, named Madame Céline Alvarez Baa, who requested that a mass be said for Victor Hugo after news of the author’s death.
Curious to know the reason for Madame Baa’s interest in Victor Hugo, Cathonoy asked questions, and learned that Madame Baa had given Adèle shelter when she was abandoned on Barbados, where she was known as “Madame Pinson”.

Adèle had been found wandering the streets, talking to herself, detached from her surroundings.
Madame Baa took the initiative to take Adèle to her family in Paris.
Adèle was then left in medical care.
A grateful Victor Hugo reimbursed Madame Baa for her expenses.

Erotomania

Adèle’s obsession was a manifestation of erotomania.
Along with her other symptoms of mental illness, including hallucinations, Adèle’s condition indicates schizophrenia.

The illness appeared in other members of the Hugo family.
Victor Hugo’s brother Eugène was also schizophrenic.

She was ultimately sent to live in a mental institution for the affluent outside Paris.
She remained there until her death.
Out of Victor Hugo’s five children, Adele was the only one who outlived him.

Much of what is known about Adèle’s life and her pursuit of Pinson comes from her diaries and letters.
Adèle kept a journal while she lived on Jersey and Guernsey, which she titled Journal de l’Exil (Diary of the Exile).
She stopped keeping a diary by the time she landed in Barbados, due to her mental deterioration.


SOURCES: “Adèle Hugo”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

How come you picked up Adele Hugo all of a sudden?

Well. . . I viewed the film: “The Story of Adele H.” a few years ago.



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“Actual List”

So you’d watched 1,636 movies by May 2017, hadn’t you?

Yes, I had.

So, Kato, you’re a flick maniac, huh?

You’re telling me… Look at Number 1624 in the above list.

So you watched “The Story of Adele H” on May 1, 2017, huh?… How did you like it?

I loved viewing it, which is a quite amazing movie.


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“Actual Page”


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Kato’s Comment

 

This is a 1975 French historical docudrama directed by François Truffaut, based on Adèle Hugo’s diaries.

It shows the life of Adèle Hugo, the daughter of world-famous Victor Hugo, whose obsessive unrequited love for a military officer leads to her downfall and insanity.


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Her father places her in an asylum in Saint-Mandé, where she lives for the next forty years.

She gardens, plays the piano and writes in her journal.

Adèle Hugo died in Paris in 1915 at the age of 85.

Although it is an heartbreaking drama, the film almost appears like a dramedy when Adèle views the show of a greedy hypnotizer.

At the time I laughed my head off to death.

Superb is the performance of 20-year-old Isabelle Adjani as Adèle Hugo.

Did you really laugh your head off to death?

Well… of course, I exaggerated a bit, but the scene appeared quite hilarious… You should view the movie.

I think I’m gonna book the DVD.

You’d better hurry… Four people are still waiting…


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【Himiko’s Monologue】


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Well…, have you ever watched the movie of the Jean Valjean story?

If you speak Japanese, there is a Japanese version.

Here it is.

The following movie was made in 1950.


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Jean Valjean is played by Sessue Hayakawa (早川 雪洲 1889-1973) who starred in Japanese, American, French, German, and British films.

Hayakawa was one of the biggest stars in Hollywood during the silent era of the 1910s and 1920s.

He was the first actor of Asian descent to find stardom as a leading man in the United States and Europe.


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His broodingly handsome good looks and typecasting as a sexually dominant villain made him a heartthrob among American women during a time of racial discrimination, and he became one of the first male sex symbols of Hollywood.

During those years, Hayakawa was as well-known and popular as Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks, although today his name is largely unknown to the public.

In any case, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


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(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor

Popes@Spotlight

Fireflies

Richard III

Savage vs. Civilized

Submerging Island


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)

 


(1001nite10.jpg)

 

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Submerging Island

 

Submerging Island

 


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Kato… are you talking about climate change and global warming?


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Oh yes, I am… Diane, how come you’ve grimaced all of a sudden.

You see, Kato… Quite a few people say, the ice at the North Pole is melting and we’ll be drowned in the near future… I’m sick and tired of hearing such a mambo jumbo.

 


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Well… But if it’s true, what would you say?

Kato, do you really believe such a crap?

Oh yes, I read the following news article in the local town papers:

Antarctica’s ice melt has trippled

in just one decade

If this continue, the planet will be

in big trouble


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“Enlarge!”

“Actual Page”

 

By Chris Mooney

The Washington Post

Wed., June 13, 2018

 

Antarctica’s ice sheet is melting at a rapidly increasing rate, now pouring more than 180 billion tonnes of ice into the ocean annually and raising sea levels a half-millimetre every year, a team of 80 scientists reported Wednesday.

The melt rate has tripled in the past decade, the study concluded.

If the acceleration continues, some of scientists’ worst fears about rising oceans could be realized, leaving low-lying cities and communities with less time to prepare than they had hoped.

The result also reinforces that nations have a short window — perhaps no more than a decade — to cut greenhouse-gas emissions if they hope to avert some of the worst consequences of climate change.

Antarctica, the planet’s largest ice sheet, lost 199 billion tonnes of ice annually from 2012 through 2017 — approximately triple the 66 billion-tonne melt rate of a decade ago, the scientists concluded.

From 1992 through 1997, Antarctica lost 44 billion tonnes of ice annually.

But, Kato, the above article is about the South Pole, isn’t it?

Oh yes, however, the situation is the same… At both Poles, the ice is melting.

You know, Kato, you don’t worry about climate change too much.

Why is that?

‘Cause climate change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time—decades to millions of years… That is, without human activites, climate has changed up and down since the birth of the globe.

Yes, I know, there have been at least five major ice ages in the Earth’s history.  Outside these ages, the Earth seems to have been ice free even in high latitudes.

So, regardless of our activities, climate has changed up and down in terms of temperature.

You’re absolutely right on, Diane.  By the way, I watched the following documentary at Vancouver Public Library.


(lib80620b.png)


“Enlarge!”

“Actual Page”

Full Movie

  My Comment

 

This is a 101-minute documentary directed by Jon Shenk in 2011 about world climate change.

The film focuses on the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference, commonly known as the Copenhagen Summit, which was held at the Bella Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 7 and 18 December 2009.

This conference marked the first time in history that China, India, and the United States agreed to reduce carbon emissions.

The agreement, however, is NOT legally binding and does NOT contain any legally binding commitments for reducing carbon emissions.

Although the safe level is below 350, the atmospheric carbon emissions continued to rise from 387 to 390 parts per million in the following year.

In February 2012, Mohamed Nasheed resigned the presidency under the threat of violence in a coup d’état perpetrated by security forces loyal to the former dictator.

“It is going to be very difficult,” said Mohamed Nasheed, “for us to adapt to climate change issues if we do not have a solid and secure democratic governance.”


(lookanim.gif)

It is a profoundly eye-opening documentary.

You viewed the above film on April 15, 2017, didn’t you?

Yes, I did… You see, the conference at Copenhagen marked the first time in history that China, India, and the United States agreed to reduce carbon emissions… That is, they admitted that carbon emissions cause global warming.

I know, but some people don’t agree on that.

You’re telling me… Incidentally, I also watched the following documentary:


(lib80620a.png)


“Enlarge!”

“Actual Page”

Full Movie

  My Comment

 

Originally broadcast on October 23, 2012 as a FRONTLINE TV program, this 55-minute documentary delves into the climate change.

Obviously many politicians and lobbyists redifine the policies of global warming.

Why?

Conspiracy?

It involves denial, dismissal, or unwarranted doubt that contradicts the scientific opinion on climate change.

Some people seem to promote climate change skepticism.

Why?

If you’re interested in climate change, this is a must-see.


(laughx.gif)

As I jotted down in the above, some people seem to promote climate change skepticism.

Well…, Look at the top comment, which says, “The doomsayers cannot explain the medieval warming period, nor can they explain the prolonged mini ice age of the 17th and 18th centuries. Climate change is an enormously complex scientific puzzle, and the computer models that predict armageddon are only as accurate as the assumptions of those who programmed them.”

It might be true, but 98% of renowned scientists agree that carbon emissions cause today’s global warming… If you’re in doubt, watch the following documentary:


(lib80621a.png)


“Enlarge!”

“Actual Page”

  My Comment

 

Directed by Ruth Chao in 2014, this 55-minute documentary delves into the climate change and global warming.

In the period from 1880 to 2012, the global average (land and ocean) surface temperature has increased by 0.85°C while in the period from 1906 to 2005, Earth’s average surface temperature rose by 0.74±0.18°C.

The rate of warming almost doubled in the last half of that period.

Climate proxies show the temperature to have been relatively stable over the one or two thousand years before 1850.

Recently, however, the warming evident in the instrumental temperature record is consistent with a wide range of observations, as documented by many independent scientific groups.

Those observations include sea level rise, widespread melting of snow and land ice, increased heat content of the oceans, increased humidity, and the earlier timing of both spring events and the flowering of plants.

The probability that these changes could have occurred by chance is virtually zero.

That is, these changes are induced by human activities.

It is an alarming and thought-provoking documentary.


(rodin009.png)

So, Kato, you definitely believe, global warming is induced by human activities.

Oh yes, you’re telling me… If you’re still in doubt, you should also watch the following film:


(lib80621b.png)


“Enlarge!”

“Actual Page”

Full Movie

  My Comment

 

Originally broadcast as an episode of the series “NOVA” on the PBS, this 54-minute documentary delves into the silent killer in the oceans.

We’ve known for years that oceans absorb a quarter of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere.

If carbon dioxide enters the sea at an alarming rate like today, it raises the oceans’ acidity and hence increases the srength of the silent killer.

As a result, some of marine creatures are dying.

Yes, this silent killer has something to do with global warming and our carbon emissions.

It is an informative and alarming documentary you should watch if you would like to survive.


(survival2.jpg)

So, Kato, you believe that carbon emissions also kill marine creatures in addition to causing global warming, huh?

Yes, I do… Diane, are you still in doubt?

Well…, I don’t know.

Here’s a Japanese old saying: 天災は忘れた頃にやって来る.

What does that mean?

It means: Disaster strikes when you least expect it.

 


(vanflood2.jpg)


(vanflood3.jpg)


(vanflood4.jpg)

 

Kato, do you really mean that the melting ice causes a mega flood in Vancouver?

Well…, God only knows.


(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

Wow!…

Do you agree that carbon emissions also kill marine creatures in addition to causing global warming?

Certain scientists say, this is the truth.

If you’re in doubt, watch the above clips, again.

 

In any case, a disaster hits you when you’re least prepared for it.

I see some reason in the above saying, but my immediate inclination is for some food ‘cause I’m hungry.

Now I desperately want to eat Taiyaki.


(taiyaki22.jpg)

Taiyaki (literally “baked sea bream”) is a Japanese fish-shaped cake.

It imitates the shape of Tai (Japanese Red seabream).

It is also the origin of the name.

The most common filling is red bean paste that is made from sweetened azuki beans.

Other common fillings may be custard, chocolate, cheese, or sweet potato.

Some shops even sell taiyaki with okonomiyaki, gyoza filling, or a sausage inside.

Taiyaki is believed to have originated in Tokyo during the Meiji era, and can now be found all over Japan, especially at food courts of supermarkets and at Japanese festivals.

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor

Popes@Spotlight

Fireflies

Richard III

Savage vs. Civilized


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)

 


(1001nite10.jpg)

 

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Savage vs. Civilized

 

Savage vs. Civilized

 


(nean02.jpg)


(evolute03.jpg)


(down11.gif)


(atombomb.jpg)


(down11.gif)


(evolute02b.jpg)


(laugh16.gif)


(diane02.gif)

Kato. . . Why do you suddenly bring up Savage vs. Civilized?


(kato3.gif)

I was surfing the net and came across the next article. . .

 


(cargo01.jpg)

 

Thursday 27 October 2016 11:30 by Hani Richter

 

A religion that worships aircraft was started by a group of people who saw their first plane fly over Vanuatu, a remote island in the South Pacific of Australia, during the Second World War.

After the planes delivered food and supplies to the islanders, the group began to believe that cargo would be brought to them by a Messiah.

Consequently, whenever they saw a plane fly overhead they would build a replica – in the hope of more bounty.

The islanders did not know where the objects were coming from; which led them to believe that the objects derived from magic.

The religion was first discovered in 1946 by Australian government patrols, and there are a few but diverse number of cargo religions left.

Notably, one of the cargo sects is referred to as the John Frum movement because they believe Frum, a seemingly fictional First World War serviceman, is the Messiah sent from God.

Dr Richard Feynman, an astrophysicist, described the cult in a 1974 paper, he said: “During the war the [cargo religion] saw airplanes land with lots of good materials, and they want the same thing to happen now.

So they’ve arranged to imitate things like runways, to put fires along the sides of the runways, to make a wooden hut for a man to sit in, with two wooden pieces on his head like headphones and bars of bamboo sticking out like antennas — he’s the controller — and they wait for the airplanes to land.

“They’re doing everything right. The form is perfect. It looks exactly the way it looked before. But it doesn’t work. No airplanes land. So I call these things cargo cult science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they’re missing something essential, because the planes don’t land.”

Ian Haworth, an expert in cult psychology, told indy100: “There are five characteristics that make up a cult. A cult is a group using forced techniques of cohesion using psychology and other forms.

“I would suggest that doesn’t sound like a cult, that’s not a cult in our definition. They have adopted a system of worship.”

Haworth suggests that the the group are “more a sect and not a cult”.

He added: “Sects are found in all religions. However, cults have a pyramid structure with an authoritative figure at the top.”


SOURCE: From “INDY100”
       (October 27, 2016)

 


(cargo02.jpg)

 

Mankind has already flown rockets and went to the moon, but there are still savages on earth that believe that air planes will come by magic. . .

In other words, Kato, were you surprised at that?

Well. . . yes and no. . . Actually, I saw such savages in a movie while I lived in Japan quite a while ago. . .

Which movie?

The following movie. . .

 


(zankoku01.jpg)

Tales of the Bizarre:

Rites, Rituals and Superstitions

 

“A Dog’s World” or “Mondo Cane (meaning Doggish World, which is a mild Italian profanity)” is a 1962 Italian mondo documentary film written and directed by Paolo Cavara, Franco Prosperi and Gualtiero Jacopetti.

It is also known in the United States as “Tales of the Bizarre: Rites, Rituals and Superstitions”.

The film consists of a series of travelogue scenes that provide glimpses into cultural practices around the world with the intention to shock or surprise Western film audiences.

These scenes are presented with little continuity, as they are intended as a kaleidoscopic display of shocking content rather than presenting a structured argument.

Despite its claims of genuine documentation, certain scenes are either staged or creatively manipulated to enhance this effect.

The film was an international box-office success and inspired an entire genre of mondo films in the form of exploitation documentaries, many of which also include the word “Mondo” (meaning “World”) in their title.


Source: “Mondo Cane”
Free encyclopedia Wikipedia

 

Is it really a documentary?

It is supposedly a documentary, but as the above article tells, certain scenes are either staged or creatively manipulated to enhance surprise-effect.

Kato, how come you bring up Savage vs. Civilized in the first place?

Well. . . I was intereted in cargo religion. . . When I viewed the above film for the first time in my high school days, I was utterly shocked, but later I learned some “staging” and “manipulation” in the film. . . So I thought cargo religion was staged.

You didn’t believe in cargo religion, huh?

No, I didn’t. . . But I viewed the above YouTube clip and realized that cargo religion is real.

So, you now believe it, dond’t you?

Yes, I do while realizing that savages and civilized people coexist on this planet even in the age of the Internet!

Is that such a big surprise?

Diane, you’ll be flabbergasted if you listen to my story. . .

I’m all ears.

 


(allears.jpg)

 

First of all, I wrote the following article the other day. . .

 


(neanmap2.jpg)

 

As we have seen in recent genetic studies, we have apparently found that modern people have not evolved from these Neanderthal people.

Then, what kind of people are Neanderthals?

Of course, they are physically robust enough to be incomparable to our Asians.

They had about the same amount of brain as we did.

In terms of quantity alone, some Neanderthal people have found more brain than we do.

 


(nean01.jpg)

 

But there was something that was definitely worse than us.

That’s because recent research has shown that they didn’t control their words.

Anatomical examination revealed that their throat structure did not allow them to speak well.

In other words, they didn’t have many words for that reason.

This is a fatal flaw when they took a collective action such as a war.

Failure to communicate effectively means that strategies and plots cannot be used effectively.

It’s like a small Asian who has won out against a physically strong Neanderthal by practicing an ancient war strategy called “Rikutou (六韜)”.

In doing so our ancestors robbed their land and survived the ice ages.

Perhaps, from the perspective of the Neanderthals who had lost their lives and became extinct, our Homo sapiens seemed quite sly.


SOURCE: “Pathetic Neanderthals”
        (July 27, 2012)

 

I see. . . some 30,000 years ago, Neanderthals and our ancestors, Homo sapiens, coexisted, just as savages and civilized humans like us coexist now. . .

That’s right. . . Unfortunately, Neanderthals have difficulty in communication because they couldn’t speak very well.

Due to lack of effective communication, Neanderthals lost their survival chances, huh?

Yes, they did.

Is there any connection between the above story and “cargo religion“?

Yes, there is some relationship. . . Please read the following conversation.

 

The Mediterranean is said to have dried up five to six million years ago .


(june001.gif)

How come. . . ?

Look at the following map.

 


(medmap2.jpg)

“Zoom In”

 

There is a small volcanic island called “Santorini” north of Crete.

 


(santo002.jpg)


(santo001b.jpg)

 

Oh. . . you make me feel nostalgic. . .

June, you feel nostalgic, eh? . . . Well . . . I’d say, it’s a romance of Malta. . .

This Santorini island has something to do with the romance of Malta?

Yes, it has. . . This Santorini is the legendary Atlantis!

No kidding!

Well. . . There are quite a few people who think so.

 

(atlantis2.jpg + cleoani.gif)

 

Do you also consider Santorini as the legendary Atlantis?

Well. . . You don’t have to force Santorini to connect with the legendary Atlantis. . . I think “Atlantis” actually existed, but I don’t think it existed in the Atlantic Ocean as the legend says, but on the bottom of the Mediterranean. . . You see, the Mediterranean has dried up several times. . . I suppose, there was once a highly developed civilization at the bottom of the Mediterranean.

 


(med001.jpg)


(atlantis3.jpg)

“Atlantis” at the bottom

of the Mediterranean Sea

 

Eventually, the glaciers began to melt and the Atlantic waters rose, and over the closed Strait of Gibraltar, the water flowed like a waterfall.

 


(med002.jpg)

 

The flood attacked the Atlantis residents.

 


(noah01.jpg)

 

And now, the remains of “Atlantis” are at the bottom of the Mediterranean.

 

(atlantis2.jpg + cleoani.gif)

 

Among the descendants of these survivors, one group moved to the island of Malta and built the megalithic civilization, the other went to Crete and created the Minoan civilization, and yet another group went to Egypt and built the pyramids.. . This is my “Romance of Malta”.


SOURCE: “The Romance of Malta”
      (September 17, 2016)

 

It sounds quite interesting, but it’s a hypothesis, isn’t it?

Yes, it is. . . If you explore the bottom of the Mediterranean, however, you’ll find archeological remains. . .

Why don’t you explore the bottom of the Mediterranean with a submarine!

I can’t do that because I’m claustrophobic. . . If I got into a submarine, I would die by shock. . . In any case, there is evidence that there was a highly developed civilization. . .

 

 


(bermuda01.jpg)

 

Our own culture, if we assume a starting point of 4000 B.C., has progressed from primitive agriculture and herding to nuclear fission in only 6,000 years.

(The earliest fossils of anatomically modern humans are from the Middle Paleolithic, about 200,000 years ago such as the Omo remains of Ethiopia.)

Considering the age of mankind, there has been ample time for other cultures to have arrived at a level roughly corresponding to ours.

A re-examination of some of the ancient records that have come down to us might give some indication of mankind having previously attained our present aptitude for destruction.

While there are hints of great blastings of the earth’s surface in the Bible (Sodom and Gomorrah), the Greek myths, and many of the legends of the Indians of North and South America, it is in the ancient records of India, copied and recopied from prehistoric antiquity, that we find, described in considerable detail, the use and effect of what closely resembles atomic explosions in warfare.

(pp. 223-224)


In the course of an exploratory digging in southern Iraq in 1947, layers of culture were successively cored into what one might call an archaeological mine shaft.

Starting from the present ground level, the excavation passed the ancient city culture levels of Babylonia, Chaldea, and Sumeria, with flood levels between different ages of city culture, then the first village levels, then a level corresponding to that of primitive farmers at a time era of 6000 to 7000 BC, and below that, indications of a herdsman culture, and finally a time era was reached corresponding to the Magdalenian or cave culture of about 16,000 years ago.

Still farther down, at the bottom of all levels, a floor of fused glass was revealed, similar to nothing else except the desert floor in New Mexico after the blasts which inaugurated our present atomic era.

(pp. 229-230)

 

 

SOURCE:”Bermuda Triangle” By Charles Berlitz
published by Avon Books in 1974

 

In other words, a nuclear explosion occurred in southern Iraq a long time ago, didn’t it?

That’s right. . . The ancient Iraqi civilization of the same generation as the Atlantis was destroyed during this nuclear war. . .

After that, are you saying, our ancestors who lived in the cave came out, and built Mesopotamian civilization?

Yes, I am. . . Our ancestors living in the cave coexisted with the people of the Atlantis civilization before the nuclear war, just as we coexist with savages who now believe in the “cargo religion“. . .


(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

Are you interested in the lost city of Atlantis?

You must be intereted in this mystery.

Here’s the YouTube clip about it.

 


(atlantis9.jpg)

 

What do you think about the above movie?

You don’t really believe in Atlantis, do you?

Well… here’s a mood-changing clip just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to your last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor

Popes@Spotlight

Fireflies

Richard III


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)

 


(1001nite10.jpg)

 

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Richard III

 

Richard III

 


(richard3k.jpg)


(richard3.jpg)


(richard3e.jpg)

 


(diane02.gif)

Kato. . . Why do you pick up Richard III?


(kato3.gif)

Actually, I rented a DVD at Vancouver Public Library and watched the following documentary. . .

 


(lib00113c.gif)


“Zoom In”

“Actual page”

 

 

Are you interested in the history of England during the medieval period?

I’m not particularly interested in the Middle Ages of England. . . However, I pick up Richard III today because I find a grammatically wrong sentence in the cover of the said DVD. . . Please have a look at the following sentence. . .

 


(richard3p.jpg)

 

In 2001, a group of archaeologists made an incredible find:Buried beneath a parking lot they uncovered the bones of King III, hunchbacked, with an arrow through the spine.

Richard is considered by many as the most evil king to have ruled England.

He is also renowned as a fearsome warrior, despite the extreme curvature of his spine.

Now, scientists are testing the bones to learn and training a “body double” in medieval battlefield techniques to determine

whether Richard could have fought so ferociously with such a severe deformity.


The back of the DVD (Branch Call Number:942.046 R43s)

Don’t you think the above sentence in red is grammatically wrong?

What’s wrong with the above sentence?

Well, when I studied English grammar in high school, my teacher taught me that such a “past participle clause” is a typical mistake. . .

 


(richard3a.jpg)

 

Buried beneath a parking lot,

the archaeologists uncovered the bones

of King III, hunchbacked,

with an arrow through the spine.

 

Is there a grammatical error in the above sentence?

So, Diane, you think the above sentence has nothing wrong, don’t you?

I don’t think it’s particularly wrong. . .

Well, the part in red above is called “past participle clause”. . . For example, the correct usage is as follows. . .

 


(battery2.jpg)

 

Used efficiently,

the PC’s battery will last longer.

 

If you write a full sentence, it will be as follows. . .

 


(battery3.jpg)

 

If it is used efficiently,

the PC’s battery will last longer.

 

Sure, it sounds alright to me. . .

If I write the above problematic sentence in full, it will be as follows. . .

 


(richard3q.jpg)

 

While the archaeologists (NOT the bones) were

buried beneath a parking lot,

the archaeologists uncovered the bones

of King III, hunchbacked,

with an arrow through the spine.

 

In the above sentence, you see, the archeologists were buried in the parking lot. . . It sounds quite wrong, if not extremely funny. . . The correct sentence shoule be written like this:

 


(richard3p.jpg)

 

Buried beneath a parking lot,

the bones were uncovered by the archaeologists.

 

I see. . . . “Past participles clauses” are rarely used in conversation, so even the native speakers tend to make a mistake. . . Now, I know that both subjects (“bones” in this case) must match, huh?

That’s right. . . In addition, Richard III had an abnormal spine, but it was not a so-called hunchback. . .

 


(hunchbk2.jpg)

The Hunchback of Notre Dame


hunch·back

/ˈhən(t)SHbak/

noun: hunchback; plural noun: hunchbacks

a back deformed by a sharp forward angle, forming a hump, typically caused by collapse of a vertebra.

•dated•offensive

a person with a hunchback.


Definition by GOOGLE

 

In fact, Richard III had severe scoliosis.

 

Richard III

 


(richard3k.jpg)

 

Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1483 until his death in 1485.
He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty.
His defeat and death at the Battle of Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marked the end of the Middle Ages in England.
He is the protagonist of Richard III, one of William Shakespeare’s history plays.

When his brother Edward IV died in April 1483, Richard was named Lord Protector of the realm for Edward’s eldest son and successor, the 12-year-old Edward V.
Arrangements were made for Edward’s coronation on 22 June 1483.
Before the king could be crowned, the marriage of his parents was declared bigamous and therefore invalid.

Now officially illegitimate, their children were barred from inheriting the throne.
On 25 June, an assembly of lords and commoners endorsed a declaration to this effect and proclaimed Richard as the rightful king.
He was crowned on 6 July 1483.

The young princes, Edward and his younger brother Richard, Duke of York, were not seen in public after August and accusations circulated that they had been murdered on Richard’s orders.

There were two major rebellions against Richard during his reign.
In October 1483, an unsuccessful revolt was led by staunch allies of Edward IV and Richard’s former ally, Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham.
Then in August 1485, Henry Tudor and his uncle, Jasper Tudor, landed in southern Wales with a contingent of French troops and marched through Pembrokeshire, recruiting soldiers.

Henry’s forces defeated Richard’s army near the Leicestershire town of Market Bosworth.
Richard was slain, making him the last English king to die in battle.
Henry Tudor then ascended the throne as Henry VII.

Richard’s corpse was taken to the nearby town of Leicester and buried without pomp.
His original tomb monument is believed to have been removed during the English Reformation, and his remains were lost, as they were believed to have been thrown into the River Soar.

In 2012, an archaeological excavation was commissioned by the Richard III Society on the site previously occupied by Greyfriars Priory Church.
The University of Leicester identified the skeleton found in the excavation as that of Richard III as a result of radiocarbon dating, comparison with contemporary reports of his appearance, and comparison of his mitochondrial DNA with that of two matrilineal descendants of Richard III’s eldest sister, Anne of York.
He was reburied in Leicester Cathedral on 26 March 2015.

 

Discovery of remains

On 24 August 2012, the University of Leicester and Leicester City Council, in association with the Richard III Society, announced that they had joined forces to begin a search for the remains of King Richard.

The search for Richard III was led by Philippa Langley of the Society’s Looking For Richard Project with the archaeological work led by University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS).

Experts set out to locate the lost site of the former Greyfriars Church (demolished during Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries), and to discover whether his remains were still interred there.

By comparing fixed points between maps in a historical sequence, the search located the Church of the Grey Friars, where Richard’s body had been hastily buried without pomp in 1485, its foundations identifiable beneath a modern-day city centre car park.

On 5 September 2012, the excavators announced that they had identified Greyfriars church and two days later that they had identified the location of Robert Herrick’s garden, where the memorial to Richard III stood in the early 17th century.
A human skeleton was found beneath the Church’s choir.

Improbably, the excavators found the remains in the first location in which they dug at the car park.
Coincidentally, they lay almost directly under a roughly painted R on the tarmac.
This had existed since the early 2000s to signify a reserved parking space.

On 12 September, it was announced that the skeleton discovered during the search might be that of Richard III.
Several reasons were given: the body was of an adult male; it was buried beneath the choir of the church; and there was severe scoliosis of the spine, possibly making one shoulder higher than the other (to what extent depended on the severity of the condition).

Additionally, there was an object that appeared to be an arrowhead embedded in the spine; and there were perimortem injuries to the skull.
These included a relatively shallow orifice, which is most likely to have been caused by a rondel dagger, and a scooping depression to the skull, inflicted by a bladed weapon, most probably a sword.

Additionally, the bottom of the skull presented a gaping hole, where a halberd had cut away and entered it.
Forensic pathologist Dr Stuart Hamilton stated that this injury would have left the individual’s brain visible, and most certainly would have been the cause of death.
Dr Jo Appleby, the osteo-archaeologist who excavated the skeleton, concurred and described the latter as “a mortal battlefield wound in the back of the skull”.

The base of the skull also presented another fatal wound in which a bladed weapon had been thrust into it, leaving behind a jagged hole.
Closer examination of the interior of the skull revealed a mark opposite this wound, showing that the blade penetrated to a depth of 10.5 centimetres (4.1 in).

In total, the skeleton presented ten wounds: four minor injuries on the top of the skull, one dagger blow on the cheekbone, one cut on the lower jaw, two fatal injuries on the base of the skull, one cut on a rib bone, and one final wound on the pelvis, most probably inflicted after death.
It is generally accepted that postmortem, Richard’s naked body was tied to the back of a horse, with his arms slung over one side and his legs and buttocks over the other.
This presented a tempting target for onlookers, and the angle of the blow on the pelvis suggests that one of them stabbed Richard’s right buttock with substantial force, as the cut extends from the back all the way to the front of the pelvic bone and was most probably an act of humiliation.

It is also possible that Richard suffered other injuries which left no trace on the skeleton.

British historian John Ashdown-Hill had used genealogical research in 2004 to trace matrilineal descendants of Anne of York, Richard’s elder sister.
A British-born woman who emigrated to Canada after the Second World War, Joy Ibsen (née Brown), was found to be a 16th-generation great-niece of the king in the same direct maternal line.
Joy Ibsen’s mitochondrial DNA was tested and belongs to mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J, which by deduction, should also be the mitochondrial DNA haplogroup of Richard III.

Joy Ibsen died in 2008.
Her son Michael Ibsen gave a mouth-swab sample to the research team on 24 August 2012.
His mitochondrial DNA passed down the direct maternal line was compared to samples from the human remains found at the excavation site and used to identify King Richard.

On 4 February 2013, the University of Leicester confirmed that the skeleton was beyond reasonable doubt that of King Richard III.
This conclusion was based on mitochondrial DNA evidence, soil analysis, and dental tests (there were some molars missing as a result of caries), as well as physical characteristics of the skeleton which are highly consistent with contemporary accounts of Richard’s appearance.


Source:”Richard III of England”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Scoliosis

 


(richard3e.jpg)

 

Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person’s spine has a sideways curve.

The curve is usually “S”- or “C”-shaped over three dimensions.

In some, the degree of curve is stable, while in others, it increases over time.

Mild scoliosis does not typically cause problems, but severe cases can interfere with breathing.

Typically, no pain is present.

The cause of most cases is unknown, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Risk factors include other affected family members.

It can also occur due to another condition such as muscles spasms, cerebral palsy, Marfan syndrome, and tumors such as neurofibromatosis.

Diagnosis is confirmed with X-rays.

Scoliosis is typically classified as either structural in which the curve is fixed, or functional in which the underlying spine is normal.

Treatment depends on the degree of curve, location, and cause.

Minor curves may simply be watched periodically.

Treatments may include bracing, specific exercises, and surgery.

The brace must be fitted to the person and used daily until growing stops.

Specific exercises may be used to try to decrease the risk of worsening.

They may be done alone or along with other treatments such as bracing.

Evidence that chiropractic manipulation, dietary supplements, or exercises can prevent the condition from worsening is weak.

However, exercise is still recommended due to its other health benefits.

Scoliosis occurs in about 3% of people.

It most commonly occurs between the ages of 10 and 20.

Females typically are more severely affected than males.

The term is from Ancient Greek: σκολίωσις, romanized: skoliosis which means “a bending”.


Source:”Scoliosis”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The staff in charge of DVDs at Vancouver Public Library recognized the mistake, and rewrote as follows:. . .

 


(richard3p.jpg)

 

In 2011, a group of amateur historians made an incredible archaeological find:the bones of King Richard III, hunchbacked, with an arrow through the spine.

Now, scientists are testing the bones to find out more about the king and also conducting fascinating experiments to determine whether Richard could have fought so ferociously in battle with such a severe deformity.

 

But hunchbacked remains as before. . .

Nobody is perfect. . . .


(dianelin3.jpg)


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【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

You might wonder how King Richard III remains were discovered and confirmed.

Here is the answer for you, and take a close look at the following video clip.

 


(richard3r.jpg)

 

Wnat do you think about the above movie?

You don’t like an excavation story, do you?

Well… here’s a mood-changing clip just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor

Popes@Spotlight

Fireflies


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)

 


(1001nite10.jpg)

 

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Fireflies

 

Fireflies

 


(firefly1.gif)


(firefly2.gif)

 


(diane02.gif)

Kato, how come you bring up fireflies in these wintry days? . . .


(kato3.gif)

Well . . . Good question! . . . I’ve got a long story to answer your question.

Then make it short and tell me about it.

I wrote the following story:

 


(popes01.jpg)

Popes@Spotlight

 

Yes, I know you did.

You viewed “The Two Popes” at the Vancouver International Film Festival, didn’t you?

Yes, I did. . . It is one of the best movies I’ve watched this year.

 


(popes02.jpg)

 

Is the above film that good?

Oh yes, belive me. . . I swear to God it’s that good.

Actually, I read the following article the other day.

 


(vansun01.png)


Zoom In

Actual Article

 

As you see, “The Two Popes” was nominated for the 2020 Golden Globe award.

So was “Marriage Story”.

Yes, both films were shown at the VIFF.

 


(viff2019.jpg)

 

Kato, have you watched “The Two Popes” yet?

No, I haven’t. . . As you know, I made a request so that the library would hold the DVD for the movie.

 


(vplsug01.png)

 

Are you gonna wait till the library gets the DVD?

Yes, I am.

Kato, . . . It will take some time for the library to get one. . . You can watch “The Two Popes” at Vancity Theatre on Seymour Street.

 


(vancity2.jpg)

 

Really? . . . Anyway, I searched the library catalogue for both movies, but I could find none of those movies. . . So, I viewed the following movie.

 


(lib91214a.gif)


“ZOOM IN”

“ACTUAL PAGE”

My Comment

December 12, 2019

 

Written and directed by Isao Takahata in 1998 based on the 1967 semi-autobiographical short story of the same name by Akiyuki Nosaka, this animated war film depicts the lives of two siblings, Seita and Setsuko as well as their desperate struggle to survive during the final months of the Second World War.

It turns out a profoundly gripping, haunting and achingly sad anti-war drama.

 

Are you saying that the above movie has something to do with “The Two Popes”?

Oh no. . . I chose it simply because I read the original short story written by Akiyuki Nosaka. . .

I see. . . Is the story well-known in Japan.

Yes, it is. . . Actually, Nosaka won the Naoki Prize for best popular literature for this story and “American Hijiki”, which was published a month before. . . Both short stories along with four others were bundled as a book in 1968.

Then Isao Takahata directed the anime based on the short story, huh?

That’s right. . . The film was released on April 16, 1988, over twenty years from the publication of the original work.

I see. . . How does it go?

It goes like this:

 

Grave of the Fireflies

 


(fireflies5.jpg)

 

PLOT

 

On 21 September 1945, shortly after the end of World War II, a teenage boy named Seita dies of starvation in a Kobe train station.
A janitor sorts through his possessions and finds a candy tin, which he throws into a field.

The spirit of Seita’s younger sister, Setsuko, springs
from the tin and is joined by Seita’s spirit and a cloud of fireflies.
They board a train.

Some months earlier, Seita and Setsuko’s house is destroyed in a firebombing along with most of Kobe.
They escape unharmed, but their mother dies from severe burns.

Seita and Setsuko move in with a distant aunt, who convinces Seita to sell his mother’s silk kimonos for rice.
Seita retrieves supplies he buried before the bombing and gives everything to his aunt, save for a tin of Sakuma drops.

As rations shrink and the number of refugees in the house grows, the aunt becomes resentful of the children, saying they do nothing to earn the food she prepares.

Seita and Setsuko leave and move into an abandoned bomb shelter.

 


(fireflies3.jpg)

 

They release fireflies into the shelter for light.
The next day, Setsuko is horrified to find that the insects have died.
She buries them in a grave, asking why they and her mother had to die.

As they run out of rice, Seita steals from farmers and loots homes during air raids, for which he is beaten.
When Setsuko falls ill, Seita takes her to a doctor, who explains that she is suffering from malnutrition.

Desperate, Seita withdraws all the money in their mother’s bank account.
As he leaves the bank, he becomes distraught when he learns that Japan has surrendered.
He also learns that his father, a captain in the Imperial Japanese Navy, is most likely dead, as most of Japan’s navy has been sunk.

Seita returns to the shelter with a large quantity of food, but finds Setsuko hallucinating – she assumes that a few marbles she finds are the previously mentioned Sakuma drops, and offers Seita rocks, thinking she had just made rice balls.

Seita hurries to feed her, but she dies as he finishes preparing the food, and she herself falls asleep.

 


(fireflies4.jpg)

 

Seita cremates Setsuko’s body and her stuffed doll in a straw casket.

He carries her ashes in the candy tin along with his father’s photograph, and though his death is never explicitly shown again, it can be assumed this is where everything ends for them.

Seita and Setsuko’s deceased spirits arrive at their destination, healthy and happy.
Surrounded by fireflies, the siblings rest on a hilltop bench overlooking the skyline of present-day Kobe.


SOURCE: “Grave of the Fireflies”
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

… seems like a sad story.

Yes, it is. . . You might cry if you see it.

Anyway, I’d like to watch the film.

You can see the full movie here.


(fireflies2.jpg)

 


(dianelin3.jpg)


(laughx.gif)

【Himiko’s Monologue】


(himiko22.gif)

The following clip is a live-action TV drama of “Grave of the Fireflies”, made by NTV in Japan.

It was produced in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II.

Like the anime, the live-action version of “Grave of the Fireflies” focuses on two siblings struggling to survive the final days of the war in Kobe, Japan.

Unlike the animated version, it tells the story from the point of view of their cousin (the aunt’s daughter) and deals with the issue of how the war-time environment could change a kind lady into a hard-hearted woman.

It stars Nanako Matsushima as the aunt, as well as Mao Inoue as their cousin.

 


(fireflies6.jpg)

 

Wnat do you think about the above movie?

You don’t like a war-time story, do you?

Well… here’s a mood-changing clip just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


(mrmathane.jpg)

  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


(hand.gif)


(renge400.jpg)

If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


(cook002.jpg)

“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


(juneswim.jpg)

Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


(biker302.jpg)

Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


(dianesun.jpg)

Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor

Popes@Spotlight


(surfin2.gif)


(bare02b.gif)

Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


(lib81126a.png)

『Actual List』


(june001.gif)

Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


(1001nite.jpg)

 


(1001nite10.jpg)

 

The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


(bellyan15.gif)

ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


(renge730.jpg)

『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


(bikini901b.jpg)


(dogs17.gif)


(girlxx.gif)

Popes@Spotlight

 

Popes@Spotlight

 


(popes01.jpg)


(spotlight2.jpg)

 


(dianelin3.jpg)

I enjoyed VIFF.

 

From: diane123@vancouver.ca
To: barclay1720@aol.com
DATE: Oct 29, 2019, 11:25 AM

Hi kiddo,

Sure did enjoy the VIFF this year … I always do.

In fact, it seems to me that this was their best year ever for riveting films.

 


(viff2019.jpg)

 

Perhaps I was just lucky enough to choose the ones that appealed to my taste.

My absolute favorites was “The Two Popes” with Jonathan Pryce and Anthony Hopkins.

It was showing in NY recently so will probably make it to Vancouver one of these days.

Powerful acting; shot primarily in the Vatican and although a film it also felt like a relevant documentary.

You don’t have to be a Catholic to enjoy this one; the audience gave the loudest and biggest cheers at the close.

Gotta love films; I know you do as well.

In fact you’re the King of Films since you’ve viewed more than 2500 movies so far.

 


(lib91120a.png)


“Zoom IN”

“ACTUAL PAGE”

 

Glad you escaped those terrible typhoons and also glad you’re having a good reunion with your relatives.

Come back safe and sound, and thanks for this.

You’re also the King of Research, I think.

 

Beautiful fall colors have been on display for weeks,

A video of my Outdoor Walking Group was on CTV last week … the idea being this weather brings out the kid in all of us when it comes to playing with the leaves and ooohing and aahhhing.

 


(byebye7.gif)

 

Ciao for now,

Diane


(kato3.gif)

So, Diane, you enjoyed VIFF from the bottom of your heart, didn’t you?


(diane02.gif)

Oh yes, very much so. . . I still believe, VIFF 2019 was their best year ever for riveting films.

You love “The Two Popes” best of all films for the festival, eh?

Yes, I do.

I haven’t seen it yet. . . Tell me about it.

Well . . . It is a docudrama directed by Fernando Meirelles and written by Anthony McCarten, based on McCarten’s 2017 play “The Pope”. . . It stars Anthony Hopkins as Pope Benedict XVI and Jonathan Pryce as Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the future Pope Francis.

 


(popes01.jpg)

 

It is an adaptation from the play, eh?

Yes, it is. . . Anyway, many people love it.

Oh yeah?

Actually, according to Variety, it is an absolute hit at its premiere at the Telluride Film Festival, receiving praise for its humour and the two lead actors’ performances. . . On the review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 91% based on 33 reviews, with an average of 7.8/10. . . On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 83 out of 100.

I see. . . So what is so good about the movie?

As I said in the email, the performances of the major actors are superb.

I wonder how it goes. . .

Well . . . It is about one of the most dramatic transitions of power in the last 2,000 years.

Oh yeah?

Frustrated with the direction of the church, Cardinal Bergoglio requests permission to retire in 2012 from Pope Benedict.

Then what happens?

Instead, facing scandal and self-doubt, the introspective Pope Benedict summons his harshest critic and future successor to Rome to reveal a secret that would shake the foundations of the Catholic Church.

. . . sound interesting!

Oh yes, it is. . . Behind Vatican walls, a struggle commences between both tradition and progress, guilt and forgiveness, as these two very different men confront their pasts in order to find common ground and forge a future for a billion followers around the world.

Diane, I’m not really interested in religious matters, but I understand how come Cardinal Bergoglio wanted to retire in 2012.

Oh do you? . . . Tell me why the cardinal wanted to retire.

Well . . . I viewed “Spotlight” three years ago.

 


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“ZOOM IN”

“ACTUAL PAGE”


(spotlight2.jpg)

My Comment

November 24, 2016

 

This is a 2015 American docudrama directed by Tom McCarthy.

It shows the story of The Boston Globe’s “Spotlight” team—the oldest continuously operating newspaper investigative journalist unit in the United States—and its investigation into cases of widespread and systemic child sex abuse in the Boston area by numerous Roman Catholic priests.

It is based on a series of stories by the “Spotlight” team that earned The Globe the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.

The film shows engrossingly detailed account of the team’s investigation into the widespread pedophilia scandals and subsequent cover-ups within the Catholic Church.

It is amazing to know that it took so long for those bloody cases to go public.

 

Are you saying that Cardinal Bergoglio wanted to retire after seeing the above movie?

Oh no. . . The above movie was released in 2015. . . The cardinal told the pope in 2012 that he wanted to retire. . . So obviously the cardinal hadn’t seen the above movie when he told the pope his wish to retire.

Then why did he want to retire?

Well . . . Even though he didn’t see the above movie, he must’ve known the widespread pedophilia scandals and subsequent cover-ups within the Catholic Church.

So Cardinal Bergoglio was sick and tired of the scandals and cover-ups, huh?

Yes, that’s the reason, I think, the cardinal wanted to retire.

I doubt.

Diane, there are so many cases reported for sexual abuses by priests. . . See the following for example.

 

Priest sex abuse:

 

New report lists 212 Catholic priests

in Oakland, San Jose, San Francisco dioceses

accused of child sex abuse


(badpriest.jpg)


“Zoom IN”

“ACTUAL PAGE”

 

In addition to the newspapers, there are a number of YouTube clips discloseing sex abuse by priests:

 

 

Naturally, Cardinal Bergoglio must’ve known these scandals and was worried about the future of the Catholic Church.

I see. . . I sympathize with the victims. . . In any case, I strongly recommend you view “The Two Popes”.

I’d really love to see it. . . Actually, I’ve just placed a purchase request for the DVD.

 


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So, you’re gonna borrow it as soon as the library gets one.

Yes, I will.


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【Himiko’s Monologue】


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Nobody is perfect, but when I heard that a priest raped a nun, I got madly angry.

 


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Wnat do you think about the above incident?

You don’t like sexual scandals, do you?

Well… here’s a mood-changing clip just for you.

Gess what?… You can now laught to the last tears.

 


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  Mr. Mathane

 

In any road, I expect Kato will write another interesting article soon.

So please come back to see me.

Have a nice day!

Bye bye …


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If you’ve got some time,

Please read one of the following artciles:


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“JAGEL”

“JAGEL Again”

“Say NO!”

Happy Gal in Canada

Roof of Vancouver

Aftershock

Whiplash

Sex Appeal

Better Off Without Senate

Fire Festival

Sweets@Paris

Scary Quake

MH370 Mystery

Putin’s Way

Trump @ Vancouver

Otter & Trump


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Changeling

Fiddler on the Roof

Flesh and Bone

Maiden’s Prayer

Romeo & Juliet

Trump @ Joke

Halloween in Shibuya

Trump Shock

Happy New Year!


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Life or Death

Way to Millionaire

Adele Hugo

Middle Sexes

Romance@Madison

Hacksaw Ridge

Eight the Dog

Halloween@Shibuya

Chef Babette


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Ramen Boom

from Korea

Omakase@Sushi

Crocodile Meat

Killer Floods

Climate of Doubt

Glory of Death

Big Mystery

Hitler and Trump

Hot October

2018 BC Ballot

Bach Collegium Japan

Dolly the Sheep

Golden Shower

Cleopatra

Strange Love

Quartet

Unknown Tragedy

World War B.C.

Mystery of Dimension

Call Girl Mystery

Typhoon & Emperor


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Hi, I’m June Adams.

Kato is a real movie lover, who tries to watch 1001 movies.

As a matter of fact, he has already accomplished his goal.


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『Actual List』


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Kato watched “The Arabian Nights” or “One Thousand and One Nights” as his 1001th movie.

You might just as well want to view it.


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The stories in “the Arabian Nights” were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa.

The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature.

In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hazār Afsān which in turn relied partly on Indian elements.

What is common throughout all the editions of the Nights is the initial frame story of the ruler Shahryār and his wife Scheherazade and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves.

The stories proceed from this original tale.

Some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord.

Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.


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ところで、愛とロマンに満ちた

レンゲさんのお話をまとめて

『レンゲ物語』を作りました。

もし、レンゲさんの記事をまとめて読みたいならば、

次のリンクをクリックしてくださいね。

『愛とロマンのレンゲ物語』


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『軽井沢タリアセン夫人 – 小百合物語』

とにかく、今日も一日楽しく愉快に

ネットサーフィンしましょうね。

じゃあね。


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